Selected Nigerian Local Diet Effects on Blood Glucose Response of Undergraduates of Imo State University, Owerri
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 9, Issue 3, May 2020, Pages: 69-77
Received: Oct. 5, 2019; Accepted: Feb. 11, 2020; Published: May 27, 2020
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Authors
Onyeneke Esther-Ben Ninikanwa, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria
Olawunmi Ijeoma, Department Food Science and Technology, School of Engineering and Engineering Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Adedokun Ishola Isaaq, Department Food Science and Technology, Imo State Polytechnic Umuagwo, Ohaji, Nigeria
Obichere Goddard Chiedubem, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria
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Abstract
The effects of some local diets on the blood glucose response of Ten (10) selected undergraduates of Imo State University were investigated. The food samples investigated were glucose (control), breadfruit cake (Treculiaafricana), egusi cake (Agbaratti, Kpurukpuru, Mgbam) (Citruluslanatus) and groundnut soup (Arachis hypogea). The breadfruit was washed, boiled and cooked with other ingredients such as palm oil, pepper, onions, maggi and salt. The egusi sample was sorted, milled and pepper, onions, red oil and salt added. It was molded into shape, wrapped in a leaf (nturukpa) and boiled. The groundnut was sorted and milled and used to prepare groundnut soup. The result obtained from the study revealed that Sample B (breadfruit cake) has the highest moisture content (55.77%). Sample E (egusi cake) recorded the highest protein (33.39%). Sample G (groundnut soup) has the highest fat (12.24%) and ash (3.21%) content. Crude fiber was highest in Sample G (groundnut soup) (2.00%). The highest carbohydrate was seen in Sample B (breadfruit cake) (20.14%) while (Sample G) groundnut soup has the least (5.30%). The overall acceptability of Sample B (breadfruit cake) is higher (8.1%) compared to the overall rating of other food samples. However, no significant difference (p>0.05) existed in overall rating scores of the food samples. The blood glucose response result shows that Glucose has it’s peak at 30 minutes (118.20mg/dl) followed by Sample B (breadfruit cake) (115.0mg/dl) while Egusi cake has the lowest response (82mg/dl). A close relationship was observed between the responses of glucose and Sample B (breadfruit cake) at 15 minutes (94.1 mg/dl and 96.9mg/dl), 30 minutes (118.2mg/dl and 115 mg/dl) and 45 minutes (111.3mg/dl and 118.3mg/dl) which suggest that Sample B (breadfruit cake) contains more carbohydrate than the other test foods. The glycemic index has been recommended to help guide food choice because low-glycemic index foods have been shown to improve blood glucose control in people with diabetes and to increase insulin sensitivity and β-cell function.
Keywords
Local Diets, Undergraduates of Imo State University, Blood Glucose Response
To cite this article
Onyeneke Esther-Ben Ninikanwa, Olawunmi Ijeoma, Adedokun Ishola Isaaq, Obichere Goddard Chiedubem, Selected Nigerian Local Diet Effects on Blood Glucose Response of Undergraduates of Imo State University, Owerri, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 9, No. 3, 2020, pp. 69-77. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20200903.11
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Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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