An Investigation on the Causes of Escherichia coli and Coliform Contamination of Cheddar Cheese and How to Reduce the Problem (A Case Study at a Cheese Manufacturing Firm in Harare, Zimbabwe)
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 6-1, November 2014, Pages: 6-14
Received: Sep. 9, 2014; Accepted: Sep. 15, 2014; Published: Sep. 17, 2014
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Authors
Amanda Kwenda, Department of Food Processing Technology, School of Industrial Sciences & Technology, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Box BE 277, Belvedere, Harare, Zimbabwe
Moses Nyahada, Department of Food Processing Technology, School of Industrial Sciences & Technology, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Box BE 277, Belvedere, Harare, Zimbabwe
Amos Musengi, Department of Food Processing Technology, School of Industrial Sciences & Technology, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Box BE 277, Belvedere, Harare, Zimbabwe
Misheck Mudyiwa, Department of Food Processing Technology, School of Industrial Sciences & Technology, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Box BE 277, Belvedere, Harare, Zimbabwe
Perkins Muredzi, Department of Food Processing Technology, School of Industrial Sciences & Technology, Harare Institute of Technology, Ganges Rd, Box BE 277, Belvedere, Harare, Zimbabwe
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the causes of E. coli contamination of Cheddar cheese through the application of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) principles. Cheese samples were analyzed for E. coli and coliforms after production, during the validation stage, as well as at the verification stage. Average E. coli and coliform counts were analyzed statistically using the t-test. Results showed that after the implementation of the corrective measures there was a decrease in E. coli and coliform counts at the 5% level of significance. Results presented in this study also show that manufacturing Cheddar cheese whole observing high standards of hygiene improves the reduces E. coli and coliform contamination of the product, even though the problem is not completely eliminated.
Keywords
Validation, Hazard Analysis Critical Points (HACCP), Pathogenic Microorganisms, Coliform Count
To cite this article
Amanda Kwenda, Moses Nyahada, Amos Musengi, Misheck Mudyiwa, Perkins Muredzi, An Investigation on the Causes of Escherichia coli and Coliform Contamination of Cheddar Cheese and How to Reduce the Problem (A Case Study at a Cheese Manufacturing Firm in Harare, Zimbabwe), International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Special Issue: Optimizing Quality and Food Process Assessment. Vol. 3, No. 6-1, 2014, pp. 6-14. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.s.2014030601.12
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