Proximate Composition, Phytonutrients and Antioxidant Properties of Oven Dried and Vacuum Dried African Star Apple (Chrysophyllum albidum) Products
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 6-1, November 2017, Pages: 22-25
Received: Jul. 31, 2017; Accepted: Aug. 1, 2017; Published: Oct. 10, 2017
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Authors
Oluwole Oluwatoyin Bolanle, Food Technology Department, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi, Lagos, Nigeria
Odediran Olajumoke, Food Technology Department, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi, Lagos, Nigeria
Ibidapo Olubunmi Pheabean, Food Technology Department, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi, Lagos, Nigeria
Owolabi Samuel, Food Technology Department, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi, Lagos, Nigeria
Chuyang Li, Department of Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods, Institute of AgroFood Science and Technology, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing, China
Garry Shen, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada
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Abstract
Chrysophyllum albidum has been reported to be a medicinal plant due to its high Vitamin C content and the presence of phytonutrient such as phenols and flavonoids. Freshly harvested African star apple fruits were processed and separated into pulp, seeds and peel and were dried between 60°C to 65°C using different forms of drying technology, specifically Oven drying and Vacuum drying. The dried products were subjected to proximate, elemental and vitamin C analysis. Also, the total phenolic and flavonoid content of the products were determined and their antioxidant potentials explored. Results showed that samples that were vacuum dried retained their nutritional composition, phytonutrient content and antioxidant potentials better than samples that were oven dried. Also, results showed that the seeds appeared to contain more fibre, ash, protein and fat content than all other fruit parts. However, the pulp contained more moisture and Vitamin C content while the peels were the richest in carbohydrates. Results also revealed that the pulp had the highest phytonutrient content and as such exhibited more antioxidant potentials than all other fruit part.
Keywords
C. albidum, Antioxidant, Vacuum Drying, Oven Drying
To cite this article
Oluwole Oluwatoyin Bolanle, Odediran Olajumoke, Ibidapo Olubunmi Pheabean, Owolabi Samuel, Chuyang Li, Garry Shen, Proximate Composition, Phytonutrients and Antioxidant Properties of Oven Dried and Vacuum Dried African Star Apple (Chrysophyllum albidum) Products, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Special Issue: Advances in Food Processing, Preservation, Storage, Biotechnology and Safety. Vol. 6, No. 6-1, 2017, pp. 22-25. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.s.2017060601.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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