Protein and Mineral Element Levels of Some Fruit Juices (Citrus spp.) in Some Niger Delta Areas of Nigeria
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 6-1, November 2014, Pages: 58-60
Received: Jul. 7, 2014; Accepted: Nov. 25, 2014; Published: Dec. 27, 2014
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Authors
Chuku L. C., Dept. of Biochemistry, University of Port Harcourt, P. M. B. 5323, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
Chinaka N. C., Dept. of Biochemistry, University of Port Harcourt, P. M. B. 5323, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
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Abstract
The experiment carried out on grape, lime, orange and lemon fruit juices show that orange juice has the least acidic pH value of 4.09, while lime juice has the highest value of 2.09. Grapefruit had the highest percent of protein content at 0.92% while orange juice recorded the least percentage protein content at 0.51%. Mineral elements analyzed show that lemon juice had the highest potassium and calcium content with value of 195.45ppm and 3.52ppm respectively, while orange juice recorded the highest value of magnesium at a value of 0.426ppm. Lime juice recorded the highest iron content with a value of 2.998ppm. This finding compares the concentration of mineral element and protein level of some fruit juices commonly consumed in some Niger Delta areas of Nigeria, as well as determining their pH values. From the results obtained, citrus fruits are therefore highly recommended for consumption as a result of their high mineral element and low protein contents with exception to lime which might increase the acidity of the body.
Keywords
Citrus, Element, Fruit, Grape, Juice, Lemon, Lime, Mineral, Orange
To cite this article
Chuku L. C., Chinaka N. C., Protein and Mineral Element Levels of Some Fruit Juices (Citrus spp.) in Some Niger Delta Areas of Nigeria, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Special Issue: Optimizing Quality and Food Process Assessment. Vol. 3, No. 6-1, 2014, pp. 58-60. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.s.2014030601.18
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