Development and Assessment of Conformance of Cowpea Flour for Cake Production
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 3, May 2015, Pages: 320-325
Received: Jan. 16, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 10, 2015; Published: Apr. 18, 2015
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Authors
Agboka Judith Akosua, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Ho Polytechnic, Ho, Ghana
Kpodo Fidelis Mawunyo Kwasi, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Ho Polytechnic, Ho, Ghana
Dzah Courage Sedem, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Ho Polytechnic, Ho, Ghana
Mensah Christopher, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Ho Polytechnic, Ho, Ghana
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Abstract
Cowpea is a nutritious component in human diet as well as livestock feed. It is of major importance to the livelihoods of millions of people in developing countries because it is an important source of proteins, minerals and vitamins. The leaves, pods and seeds of cowpea are consumed. This study explored the feasibility of preparing a Supreme Quality Cowpea Flour (SQCF) as a substitute for wheat flour for the preparation of cakes. Development of the composite cowpea-wheat flour followed a 3 x 2 factorial design with cowpea-wheat proportions (100%:0%, 75%:25% and 50%:50%) and heat treatments (150 and 200 oC) as factors. The composite flour produced was then used to produce cake and evaluated sensorially based on ranking for preference. Hundred percent (100%) wheat flour cake was used as control. The composite flour with proportion 50%:50% cowpea: wheat baked at 200 oC produced the most preferred cake which was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in terms of taste (7.22±2.01) and overall acceptability (7.03±1.82) when compared with the taste (6.67±1.84) and overall acceptability (6.80 ±1.81) of the control. The application of this by industry will encourage the use of cowpea, a readily available legume for the production of cake.
Keywords
Cakes, Composite Flour, Cowpea, Supreme Quality Cowpea Flour (SQCF)
To cite this article
Agboka Judith Akosua, Kpodo Fidelis Mawunyo Kwasi, Dzah Courage Sedem, Mensah Christopher, Development and Assessment of Conformance of Cowpea Flour for Cake Production, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 3, 2015, pp. 320-325. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20150403.19
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