Dietary Supplementation of Citrus limon L. (Lemon) and Evaluation of Its Role to Prevent and Cure of Vitamin C Deficiency Diseases
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2020, Pages: 1-5
Received: Dec. 19, 2019; Accepted: Jan. 6, 2020; Published: Feb. 4, 2020
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Authors
Zubaer Hosen, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Shahin Afroz Bipasha, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Sadat Kamal, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Sumaiyah Rafique, Department of Food and Nutrition, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Bariul Islam, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Kaniz Fatema, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Vitamin C is an essential dietary component must be ingested for survival. Because of not being produce in the body it must be supplied exogenously by foods and supplements. Citrus limon L. (Lemon) is a citrus fruits, cheap but rich sources of vitamin C. Due to high levels of vitamin C content, it can prevent and cure the vitamin C related disease including gum bleeding, poor wound healing, skin diseases, tiredness, joint pain and edema. A total of 200 people (105 were males and 95 were females) were selected for the study. In order to assess vitamin C status, symptoms like gum bleeding, poor wound healing, hyperkeratosis, excessive tiredness, joint pain and edema were collected by means of a structured questionnaires. People were then divided into two groups randomly. One group was the focus of the lemon supplementation group and another was the non-supplementation group. Then we supplied lemon to the individuals (2piece/day) of lemon supplementation group for 4 months and no lemon was provided to the non-supplementation group during the study period. After four months, we found that symptoms like gum bleeding (92.5%), poor wound healing (89.29%), hyperkeratosis (50%), excessive tiredness (89.83%), joint pain (69.23%) and edema (30%) have been cured in lemon supplementation group. On the other hand, after four months gum bleeding, poor wound healing, hyperkeratosis, excessive tiredness, joint pain and edema in non-supplementation group have not been cured like lemon supplementation group. The percentages were 20%, 21.05%, 33.33%, 25%, 14.81% and 14.29% respectively.
Keywords
Vitamin C, Scurvy, Lemon, Supplementation, Prevent, Cure
To cite this article
Zubaer Hosen, Shahin Afroz Bipasha, Sadat Kamal, Sumaiyah Rafique, Bariul Islam, Kaniz Fatema, Dietary Supplementation of Citrus limon L. (Lemon) and Evaluation of Its Role to Prevent and Cure of Vitamin C Deficiency Diseases, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 9, No. 1, 2020, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20200901.11
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Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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