Determination of Physico-Chemical Properties of Two Varieties of Okra Traditionally Dried
Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Volume 1, Issue 4, November 2013, Pages: 38-42
Received: Sep. 5, 2013; Published: Oct. 20, 2013
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Authors
Joel Brice Kouassi, Laboratory of Biochemistry, Medical Sciences Faculty, University Felix Houphouet Boigny Abidjan, 01 BP 240 Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Cisse-Camara Massara, Laboratory of Biochemistry, Medical Sciences Faculty, University Felix Houphouet Boigny Abidjan, 01 BP 240 Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Georges Gnomblesson Tiahou, Laboratory of Biochemistry, Medical Sciences Faculty, University Felix Houphouet Boigny Abidjan, 01 BP 240 Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Absalon Ake Monde, Laboratory of Biochemistry, Medical Sciences Faculty, University Felix Houphouet Boigny Abidjan, 01 BP 240 Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Daniel Essiagne Sess, Laboratory of Biochemistry, Medical Sciences Faculty, University Felix Houphouet Boigny Abidjan, 01 BP 240 Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Etienne Tia vama, Laboratory Industrial Synthesis Processes of the Environment and New Energy of the National Polytechnic Institute Felix Houphouet Boigny Yamoussoukro
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Abstract
The causes of food shortages in developing countries are many and frequent. This work was conducted in order to evaluate some physico-chemical properties of two varieties of dried okra consumed in Côte d'Ivoire. These varieties have been grown and harvested in Yamoussoukro. For Baoule variety, protein, fat, total sugars, reducing sugars, vitamin E, water, ash, dry matter, total carbohydrates, starch, sucrose, crude fiber and energy value are respectively 17.15 ± 0.01, 2.02 ± 0.25,14.66 ± 4.13, 0.86 ± 0.05, 0.087, 7.28 ± 0.50, 9.61 ± 0.36, 92.71 ± 0.36, 63.92 ± 0.75, 44.33 ± 3.88, 13.10 ± 4.35, 7.83 ± 0.21, 342.51 ± 2.97. For Dioula variety, these levels are respectively 15.75 ± 0.2, 2.17 ± 0.11, 20, 0.83 ± 0.05, 0.15, 7.33 ± 0.20, 9.50 ± 0.10, 92.60 ± 0.30, 65.24 ± 0.25, 40.71 ± 0.23, 18.20 ± 0.05, 9.07 ± 1.96, 343.14 ± 0.97. No significant difference was observed at the threshold of 5% for the levels of lipids, total sugars, reducing sugars, water, ash, dry matter, starch, sucrose, crude fiber and energy values of the two varieties. However, a significant difference was observed at the 5% threshold for the levels of protein, vitamin E and total carbohydrate. Furthermore, the content of anti-nutritional factors was low in samples except leucoanthocyanes and catechin tannins.
Keywords
Physicochemical, Okra, Traditionally Dried
To cite this article
Joel Brice Kouassi, Cisse-Camara Massara, Georges Gnomblesson Tiahou, Absalon Ake Monde, Daniel Essiagne Sess, Etienne Tia vama, Determination of Physico-Chemical Properties of Two Varieties of Okra Traditionally Dried, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 1, No. 4, 2013, pp. 38-42. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20130104.12
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