Fast Food Consumption Drift in Pakistani Population
Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 1, January 2014, Pages: 13-18
Received: Dec. 10, 2013; Published: Jan. 10, 2014
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Authors
Noor Jahan, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
Mehjabeen , Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Karachi, Pakistan
Fakhsheena Anjum, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
Sana Ghayas, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
Hina Yasin, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
M. Sajid, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
S. M. Zubair Qasmi, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
Umair Akhtar, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
Umar Akram, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
Haider Raza, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
Ahmed Ali, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
Talha Rana, Dow College of Pharmacy, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan
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Abstract
Objective: To appraise the use of various fast foods in different age groups among males and females and study its drift in Pakistani population. Method: The study was conducted from February to June 2013 in Karachi, Pakistan on a structured questionnaire. A total of n=489 individuals participated in this study among which n= 222 were males and n= 267 were females whose ages were grouped as <18 years, 18-40 years and >40 years. Fast food was categorized as fries, burgers, rolls, chicken broast and pizza whereas fibrous and vegetable diet included all vegetables in this study. Different types of diseases i.e. diabetes, asthma, hypertension, allergy, GI disorders and skin infections were also enquired about from the respondents consuming fast food. Result: The diet comprising fast food is high in energy and energy density. Fast food consumption has been reported to go along with large amounts of soft drinks which not only augments the weight of the individuals but also put them at danger to different kinds of ailments. In our study, both the genders were reported to take fast food on weekly basis, highest consumed in the age group of 18-40 years. Most popular fast food consumed among the females (n=63) was fries + burger and that in males (n=69) was more than one type of fast food. The consumption of cold drinks with fast food was seen more in males (n=105) than in females (n=90) and mostly in the age group of 18-40 years (males n=72 and females n=45). The consumption of fast food more than one time was observed more in the males. Both the genders belonged to age group of 18-40 years who exercised regularly. The frequency of use of fibrous/vegetable diet was higher in females (n=90) as compared to the male gender (n=117) in the age group of 18-40 years (p=0.033, χ2= 8.706). It was observed that the increase in weight was more in females under 18 years of age and more in males of age 18-40 years. It was also found that overall (n=72) males and (n=81) females were suffering from various diseases and yet were consuming fast food. Conclusion: Frequent fast food consumption may contribute to weight gain and with a sedentary life style can put the individuals at stake of different kinds of diseases and high health burden. Knowledge regarding healthy diet and healthy life style can contribute towards a society of people with better productivity and economy.
Keywords
Fast Food, Beverages, Obesity, Energy
To cite this article
Noor Jahan, Mehjabeen , Fakhsheena Anjum, Sana Ghayas, Hina Yasin, M. Sajid, S. M. Zubair Qasmi, Umair Akhtar, Umar Akram, Haider Raza, Ahmed Ali, Talha Rana, Fast Food Consumption Drift in Pakistani Population, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2014, pp. 13-18. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20140201.12
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