Magnitude and Factors Associated with Appropriate Complementary Feeding among Mothers Having Children 6-23 Months-of-Age in Northern Ethiopia; A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study
Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Pages: 36-42
Received: Feb. 13, 2014; Published: Mar. 20, 2014
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Authors
Ergib Mekbib, Health insurance agency Mekelle branch, Mekelle, Ethiopia
Ashenafi Shumey, Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
Semaw Ferede, Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
Fisaha Haile, Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Background- Adequate and appropriate complementary feeding during 6-23 months-of-age, is fundamental to the development of each child’s full human potential. Ethiopian national survey reports showed the minimum acceptable diet was 4.2% in same region. But in most cases only timely initiation is considered as the only indicator of complementary feeding. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of appropriate complementary feeding practices and associated factors among mothers having 6 - 23 months of age children in Northern Ethiopia. Methods- A community-based cross-sectional study design was conducted among 428 mothers who had children with 6-23 months of age in Northern Ethiopia. Simple random sampling was used to select the required number of sample. Pretest was done among 22 respondents out of the study area. A face-to-face interview was used to collect data using structured questionnaire. Data were entered with EPI info version 3.5.1 and cleaning and analysis was done by using SPSS version 16. Frequencies distribution, binary and multiple logistic regressions were done. OR with 95% confidence interval was computed to measure the strength of association. Results – The response rate was 98.6%. In this study only 10.75% (95% CI = 8.07, 13.95) children aged 6-23 months received appropriate complementary feeding. Child’s age (AOR=4.21), education level of mother (AOR=3.84), and postnatal care follow up (AOR=2.80) were found to be independent predictor of timely initiation of complementary feeding. Conclusion and recommendations – one out of ten mothers fed complementary foods appropriately to their children aged 6-23 months which was very low. Mothers who are illiterate and completed only primary school need more attention. All mothers must be encouraged to make postnatal care follow up.
Keywords
Complementary Feeding, Food Diversity, Meal Frequency, Minimum Acceptable Diet
To cite this article
Ergib Mekbib, Ashenafi Shumey, Semaw Ferede, Fisaha Haile, Magnitude and Factors Associated with Appropriate Complementary Feeding among Mothers Having Children 6-23 Months-of-Age in Northern Ethiopia; A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 36-42. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20140202.13
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