Studies on Chromium Picolinate Pre-Treated Albino Rats Given High Concentrations of Glucose D
Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Pages: 43-46
Received: Mar. 13, 2014; Published: Mar. 30, 2014
Views 3043      Downloads 118
Authors
Mieebi Martin Wankasi, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Basic Medical Science, College of Health Sciences, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria
Gborienemi Simeon George, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Basic Medical Science, College of Health Sciences, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria
Ngozi Nwankwo, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Science, Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Nkpolu-oroworukwo, Port-Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
Article Tools
PDF
Follow on us
Abstract
The status of chromium as an essential nutrient is an ongoing debate despite its widespread use as supplement. Chromium supplement has been reported to improve glucose tolerance, insulin action and promote weight loss. This study examined the effect of given high concentrations of glucose D to chromium picolinate pretreated rats. Male albino wistar rats (36) fed a standard diet for approximately 6 weeks, weighing (170-210g), were used for this study. After an overnight 12 hours fasting, the rats were divided into 2 groups (A and B). The Group A rats, further divided into 6 sub groups of three rats each, received oral glucose load of (0, 5, 10, 20 40 and 80 g/kg of body weight) respectively within 3 hours. While group B rats, were all pre-treated with 4µg/kg of chromium picolinate one hour prior to administration of concentrations of glucose D in similar manner as in group A, respectively. Plasma insulin, plasma and urine glucose measured after 24 hours, showed no statistical significant differences (P>0.05) in the mean plasma glucose, urine glucose, and plasma insulin levels between the groups. In conclusion, Chromium picolinate does not appear to improve insulin sensitivity and change plasma glucose level.
Keywords
High Glucose concentration, Glucose Tolerance, Chromium Picolinate, Blood Glucose, Plasma Insulin
To cite this article
Mieebi Martin Wankasi, Gborienemi Simeon George, Ngozi Nwankwo, Studies on Chromium Picolinate Pre-Treated Albino Rats Given High Concentrations of Glucose D, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 43-46. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20140202.14
References
[1]
Althuis M. D., Jordan N. E., Ludington E. A., Wittes J.T. (2002). Glucose and insulin responses to dietary chromium supplements: a meta-analysis. Am. J. of Clin. Nutr. 76 (1): 148–155.
[2]
Amato, P., Morales, A. J., Yen, S. S. C. (2000). Effects of chromium picolinate supplementation on insulin sensitivity, serum lipids, and body composition in healthy, non-obese, older men and women. J. Gerontol A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 55:M260–M263.
[3]
Anderson A. R., Polansky M. M., Bryden A. N., Canary J. J. (1991). Supplemental-chromium effects on glucose, insulin, glucagon, and urinary chromium losses in subjects consuming controlled low-chromium diets. Am. J. of Clin. Nutr. 54:909-9l6.
[4]
Balk E.M., Tatsioni A., Lichtenstein A.H., Lau J., Pittas A. G. (2007). Effect of chromium supplementation on glucose metabolism and lipids: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Diabetes Care. 30(8):2154–2163
[5]
Cefalu T.W., Bell-Farrow A. D., Stegner J., Wang Z.Q., King T., Terry J.G. (1999). Effect of chromium picolinate on insulin sensitivity in vivo. J. Trace Elements Exp. Med.12:71–83.
[6]
Craighead J. E. (1994). Diabetes, In: Pathology. J.B. Lippincott. Philadelphia. (2nd edition):1148-1160.
[7]
Gunton J. E., Cheung N.W., Hitchman R., Hams G., O’sullivan, C., Foster-Powell K., Mcelduff A. (2005). Chromium supplementation does not improve glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, or lipid profile: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of supplementation in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Diabetes Care. 28 (3):712–713.
[8]
Kalman D. S. (2003). Chromium picolinate and type 2 diabetes. Am. J. of Clin. Nutr. 78 (1): 192-193.
[9]
Martin J., Wang Q. Z., Zhang H. X., Wachtel D., Volaufova J., Matthews E. D., Cefalu, T.W. (2006). Attenuates Body Weight Gain and Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care. 29(8):1826–1832.
[10]
Masharani U., Gjerde C., McCoy S., Maddux A.B., Hessler D., Goldfine D. I., Youngren F. J. (2012). Chromium supplementation in non-obese non-diabetic subjects is associated with a decline in insulin sensitivity. BMC Endocrine Disorders. 12:31-40.
[11]
Phung J. O., Quercia A. R., Keating K., Baker L W., Bell L.J., White M.C., Coleman I.C. (2010). Improved glucose control associated with I.V. chromium administration in two patients receiving enteral nutrition. Am. J. of Health-System Pharm. 67(7): 535-541.
[12]
Shapiro K., Gong W. C. (2002). Natural products used for diabetes. J. Am. Pharm. Assoc. 42:217–226.
[13]
Singer G.M., Geohas J. (2006). The effect of chromium picolinate and biotin supplementation on glycemic control in poorly controlled patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized trial. Diabetes Technol. Ther. 8 (6): 636–643.
[14]
Trinder P. (1969). Annals of Biochemistry, 6:24: In: Cheesbrough, M. (1992). Medical Laboratory Manual for Tropical Countries. ELBS. Cambridge. Vol. 1(2nd edition): 527-545.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186