Comparative Evaluation of the Nutritional, Phytochemical and Microbiological Quality of Three Pepper Varieties
Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 3, May 2014, Pages: 74-80
Accepted: May 15, 2014; Published: May 30, 2014
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Authors
Christine Emmanuel-Ikpeme, Biochemistry Department, University of Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria
Peters Henry, Biochemistry Department, University of Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria
Orim Augustine Okiri, Biochemistry Department, University of Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria
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Abstract
The study investigated the comparative evaluation of nutritional, phytochemical, and microbiological quality of three pepper varieties (Capsicum annuum, Capsicum genus, and Capsicum frutescens). Three pepper varieties were purchased fresh from local market in Calabar, Cross River State. The samples were washed with distilled water and thinly sliced, (diameter of 1.0±0.1cm and thickness of 3-4mm), and then treated with chlorine concentrated solution. These samples were oven dried at temperature of 60OC for 24 hours. The samples were ground with a woring blender and stored in air-tight container. The result of the analysis showed that the proximate composition of Capsicum genus was significantly (p<0.05) higher than Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens in moisture and carbohydrate contents. Capsicum annuum was significantly (p<0.05) higher than Capsicum genus and Capsicum frutescens in fat, insoluble and soluble fibre contents. Capsicum frutescens was significantly (p<0.05) higher than Capsicum annuum and Capsicum genus in protein and ash contents. Vitamin composition showed that Capsicum annuum was significantly (p<0.05) higher than Capsicum genus and Capsicum frutescens in vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin E, niacin, vitamin B6, folic acid, and vitamin K. Mineral composition showed that Capsicum annuum was significantly (p<0.05) higher Capsicum frutescens and Capsicum genus in calcium, sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, zinc, and nickel contents. Capsicum genus was significantly (p<0.05) higher than Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens in potassium, iron and cobalt contents. Phytochemical composition showed that Capsicum annuum was significantly (p<0.05) higher than Capsicum genus and Capsicum frutescens in tannins, flavonoid, saponin, terpenoid, and carotenoid contents. Capsicum genus was significantly (p<0.05) higher than Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens in alkaloid, phenolic compound, glycoside, and limonoid contents. Capsicum frutescens was significantly (p<0.05) higher than Capsicum genus and Capsicum annuum in anthraquinone contents. Aspergillus spp and Staphylococcus spp in Capsicum annum, Capsicum genus, and Capsicum frutescens were less than 10% and 100%. Escherichia coli and salmonella in these pepper varieties were not detected or absent. The result of this analysis revealed that the three pepper varieties have high nutritive value, medicinal value and can be used to remediate diseases and sustain health.
Keywords
Pepper, Phytochemical, Proximate Composition, Calcium, Sodium
To cite this article
Christine Emmanuel-Ikpeme, Peters Henry, Orim Augustine Okiri, Comparative Evaluation of the Nutritional, Phytochemical and Microbiological Quality of Three Pepper Varieties, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2014, pp. 74-80. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20140203.15
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