Effect of Soaking African Yam Bean Seeds in Unripe Plantain Peel Ash Solutions on the Nutrients, Anti-nutrients and Functional Properties of the Flour
Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 4, July 2015, Pages: 147-151
Received: May 30, 2015; Accepted: Jun. 16, 2015; Published: Jul. 3, 2015
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Authors
Inyang Ufot Evanson, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Uyo, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria
Eyo Edima Atanguma, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Uyo, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria
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Abstract
The dark brown coloured variety of African yam bean seeds (Sphenostylis stenocarpa) were soaked in distilled water (control) and in 1,2,3,4 and 5% solutions of unripe plantain peel ash (1:3w/v) for 15h at room temperature (27+0C), decorticated and processed into flours. The effects of soaking the seeds in different concentrations of the ash solution on proximate, mineral and anti-nutrient composition as well as on the functional properties of the flours were investigated. Result showed that the treatments had varying effects on the parameters evaluated. Flours prepared from seeds that were soaked in ash solutions had significantly (p<0.05) higher protein, ash and crude fibre and significantly (p<0.05) lower carbohydrate and energy value than the values found in the flour from seeds that were soaked in water. Flours prepared from ash solutions soaked seeds had significantly (p<0.05) higher K, Ca, Na, Mg, Fe and Zn than the values found in the flour from seeds that were soaked in water. The mineral contents in the flours increased with increase in the levels of ash in the soaked solutions. On the other hand, the hydrogen cyanide, tannin, oxalate and phytate levels in the flours from ash solutions soaked seeds were significantly (p<0.05) lower than their values in the flour from seeds that were soaked in water. The reductive effect of the anti-nutrients increased with increase in the levels of ash in the solutions used to soak the seeds. Flours from ash solutions soaked seeds had significantly (p<0.05) higher oil absorption capacity, marginally (p>0.05) higher swelling index and marginally (p>0.05) lower water absorption capacity and bulk density than the flour from seeds that were soaked in water. It is evident from the study that soaking African yam bean seeds in unripe plantain peel ash solutions has beneficial effects as the flours prepared from the soaked seeds had higher levels of protein and mineral elements, lower levels of anti-nutrients and the functional properties were not impaired when compared with flour from seeds that were soaked in water.
Keywords
African Yam Bean, Anti-nutrients, Functional Properties, Nutrients, Unripe Plantain Peel Ash Solution
To cite this article
Inyang Ufot Evanson, Eyo Edima Atanguma, Effect of Soaking African Yam Bean Seeds in Unripe Plantain Peel Ash Solutions on the Nutrients, Anti-nutrients and Functional Properties of the Flour, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 147-151. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20150304.12
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