Soy Protein Detection in Raw and Cooked Meat Products Using Different ELISA Kits
Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 6, November 2016, Pages: 170-174
Received: Sep. 23, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 15, 2016; Published: Jan. 4, 2017
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Authors
Cellerino Karina, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Universidad de Buenos Aires – University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Lopez Laura Beatriz, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Universidad de Buenos Aires – University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate different ELISA kits for the detection of soy proteins in raw and cooked model systems (MS) added with soy protein concentrate 63% protein (SPC), and in commercial meat products. Nine bovine meat MS with 0-2000 ppm SPC, nine boneless ham cooked MS with 0-2000 ppm SPC and eight commercial meat products were analyzed. Three ELISA kits: Ridascreen® Fast Soya from R-Biopharm, Veratox® Quantitative Soy Allergen Test from Neogen and AgraQuant® Soy Assay from Romer were used. R-Biopharm kit detected above 5 ppm SPC in raw meat MS and above 10 ppm SPC in cooked boneless ham MS. Neogen kit detected above 250 ppm SPC in both MS. Romer kit detected above 100 ppm SPC in raw meat MS and above 50 ppm SPC in cooked boneless ham MS. Results obtained using R-Biopharm and Veratox-Neogen kits were lower than real values. It is difficult to evaluate the correct quantification of Romer kit because the results are calculated as ppb soy trypsin inhibitor (STI). Results obtained for raw MS were higher than those obtained for cooked MS using R-Biopharm and Neogen kits, while results for raw MS were lower than those obtained for cooked MS using Romer kit. For one commercial sample that did not declare soy, results were below the quantification limits for the three kits used. For three commercial samples that did not declare soy, results were 22.3; 67.0 and 67.8 ppm soy protein isolate respectively using Neogen kit. Results for four samples that did not declare soy were 448.0; 581.0 and > 1000 ppb STI in two of them, using Romer kit. Two samples declared soy products, in one of them soy was detected with all kits, and in the other Neogen and Romer kits did not detect soy. In conclusion R-Biopharm kit was the most sensitive for the analysis of these samples. Thermal processing affected results for the kits used. It was possible to detect soy in commercial meat products that did not declare soy products. The food industry should be responsible for the declaration of soy in the labels of their products.
Keywords
Allergens, Soy, Meat Products, ELISA Kits
To cite this article
Cellerino Karina, Lopez Laura Beatriz, Soy Protein Detection in Raw and Cooked Meat Products Using Different ELISA Kits, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 6, 2016, pp. 170-174. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20160406.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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