Milk Traces Detection in Cookies and Extruded Products Analyzed with Elisa Kits
Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 6, November 2016, Pages: 175-179
Received: Sep. 23, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 7, 2016; Published: Jan. 4, 2017
Views 2599      Downloads 81
Authors
Binaghi Maria Julieta, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Universidad de Buenos Aires – University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Greco Carola Beatriz, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Universidad de Buenos Aires – University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Martín Maria Eugenia, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Universidad de Buenos Aires – University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Drago Silvina Rosa, Food Technology Institute, University Nacional of Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina
Ronayne de Ferrer Patricia Ana, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Universidad de Buenos Aires – University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
López Laura Beatriz, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Universidad de Buenos Aires – University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Detection of milk traces was evaluated in cookies and extruded products model systems (MS) and in commercial products declaring milk presence through either the statement: “Contains…” or precautionary phrases. The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of two different commercial ELISA kits for this purpose. Six cookies and extruded products model systems and two different batches of eight different types of commercial cookies and two types of extruded products were analyzed. The two different commercial ELISA kits used were R-Biopharm and Veratox-Neogen. In the cookies MS both kits had the same sensitivity while in the extruded products MS, the R- Biopharm kit had higher sensitivity than the Veratox-Neogen one. In the commercial samples only the snack declaring “Contains milk derivatives” showed detectable values of milk proteins. Even though all the remaining products included precautionary phrases on the label, none of them exceeded the quantification limit. The detection and quantification of the allergen will depend on the utilized kit and the treatment to which the ingredients have been submitted. Therefore, the performance of every kit should be studied for every allergen and every particular food matrix. Regarding commercial products, the analysis of more samples coming from different batches would be necessary in order to corroborate these results and verify the correct use of precautionary phrases.
Keywords
Allergens, Milk, Cookies, Extruded Products, ELISA
To cite this article
Binaghi Maria Julieta, Greco Carola Beatriz, Martín Maria Eugenia, Drago Silvina Rosa, Ronayne de Ferrer Patricia Ana, López Laura Beatriz, Milk Traces Detection in Cookies and Extruded Products Analyzed with Elisa Kits, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 6, 2016, pp. 175-179. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20160406.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Chapman J, Bernstein L, Lee R, Oppenheimer J. 2006. Food allergy: a practice parameter. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 96 (3 Suppl 2): S1-S68.
[2]
Díaz Amigo C. 2010. Towards a Comprehensive Validation of ELISA Kits or Food Allergens. Case2-Milk. Food Analytical Methods. 3: 351-356.
[3]
Cellerino K, Binaghi MJ, Cagnasso CE, Docena G, López LB. 2014. Milk protein detection in raw and cooked meat products using immunochemical methods. Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. 2(5): 236-242.
[4]
Act N° 111 CONAL. 2016. http://www.conal.gob.ar/actas/Acta_111.pdf Access: 06/ 09/2016.
[5]
López L, Binaghi M, Greco C, Mambrín M, Valencia M. 2011. Meat species identification in cooked meat products: using SDS-PAGE as screening method. Revista Chilena de Nutrición. 38 (2): 187-196.
[6]
RIDASCREEN® Fast Milk protein (Art. No.: R4652). R-Biopharm. 2016. Available: http://www.R-Biopharm.com/products/food-feed-analysis/allergens/milk/item/ridascreenfast-milk. Access: September 2016.
[7]
Veratox® Total Milk (Code: 8470). Neogen, 2016. Available: http://foodsafety.neogen.com/en/veratox-total-milk Access: September 2016.
[8]
Díaz Amigo C, Popping B. 2010. Analytical Testing as a Tool for the Enforcement of Future Regulatory Thresholds for Food Allergens. Journal of AOAC International. 93 (2): 434-441.
[9]
Parker C, Khuda S, Pereira M, Ross M, Fu T, Fan X, Wu Y, Williams K, DeVries J, Pulvermacher B, Bedford B, Zhang X and Jackson L. 2015. Multi-allergen Quantitation and the Impact of Thermal Treatment in Industry-Processed Baked Goods by ELISA and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 63: 10669−10680.
[10]
Popping B, Diaz-Amigo C, Hoenicke K. 2010. Chapter 17 in Molecular Biological and immunological techniques and applications for food chemists. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Canada.
[11]
Besler M., Steinhart H., Paschke A. 2001. Stability of food allergens and allergenicity of processed food. Journal of chromatography B: Biomedical Sciences and Applications. 756 (1-2): 207-228.
[12]
Díaz Amigo C. 2010. Towards a Comprehensive Validation of ELISA Kits for Food Allergens. Case 1- Egg. Food Analytical Methods. 3: 344-350.
[13]
Sampson MA, Munoz-Furlong A, & Sicherer SH. 2006. Risktaking and coping strategies of adolescents and young adults with food allergy. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 117: 1440-1445.
[14]
Ward R, Crevel R, Bell I, Khandke N, Ramsay C and Paine S. 2010. A vision for allergen management best practice in the food industry. Trends in Food Science & Technology 21: 619-625.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186