Comparison of the Nutritional Status and Infant Feeding Practices Between Selected Rural and Urban Areas in Bangladesh
Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 5, September 2017, Pages: 167-171
Received: Jun. 28, 2017; Accepted: Jul. 7, 2017; Published: Aug. 4, 2017
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Authors
Abul Kashem Obidul Huq, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Tangail, Bangladesh
Nezamul Haque, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Tangail, Bangladesh; Nutrition Intervention Bangladesh, Cox’s Bazar Zone, Bangladesh
Farhana Akther, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Tangail, Bangladesh
Sonia Zebsyn, Department of Home Economics, National University, Gazipur, Bangladesh
Jasmin Ara Farhana, Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Patuakhali Science and Technology University, Patuakhali, Bangladesh
Sardar Mohammad Golam Moktadir, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Santosh, Tangail, Bangladesh
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Abstract
The study was cross sectional design and carried out among 122 mother-infant pairs of the urban and rural areas in Tangail district, Bangladesh, aimed at the comparison of infant feeding practices and nutritional status of the rural and urban areas. There was a significant difference observed in their educational level (urban graduate 44.3% compared to rural graduate 2.4%), total monthly income and expenditure on food and non-food items. The mean monthly income of urban and rural family were 34508.19±8227.67 TK. and 6422.95±1756.23 TK. respectively. Similarly monthly expenditure on foods of urban and rural family were 13090.16±2348.53 TK. and 4498.36±1394.76 TK. respectively. Colostrum feeding immediately after birth was higher in urban areas (75.4%) compared to rural (47.5%). Moreover, rural mother prefers to give honey and sugar water. In urban areas breast feeding initiated within 1 hour, but in rural areas it was given within 12 hours after birth. Urban mother provided powder milk (49.18%) as first complementary foods, in contrast, rural mothers provided mainly cow’s milk, hotchpotch made with vegetables and rice/cereal based products. Rural mother continued breast feeding practice for longer period of time than urban mothers. Majority of the urban mothers prefer egg, soup or fruits for their babies, while the rural people choices mainly the rice-potato, pulses or vegetables. The anthropometric indices shows that nutritional status of the urban infants was better than rural infants. The prevalence of moderate to severe underweight is higher in rural areas (59.01%) when compared to urban areas (18.03%). Again, moderate to severe stunted and wasted in rural areas found 39.34% & 37.69% and in urban areas 21.31% & 13.11% respectively.
Keywords
Infant, Feeding Practice, Complementary Foods, Colostrum, Nutritional Status
To cite this article
Abul Kashem Obidul Huq, Nezamul Haque, Farhana Akther, Sonia Zebsyn, Jasmin Ara Farhana, Sardar Mohammad Golam Moktadir, Comparison of the Nutritional Status and Infant Feeding Practices Between Selected Rural and Urban Areas in Bangladesh, Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 167-171. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20170505.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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