Effects of a Single Low-Intensity Resistance Exercise Session on Lipid Peroxidation of Untrained Male Students
American Journal of Sports Science
Volume 2, Issue 4, July 2014, Pages: 87-91
Received: May 19, 2014; Accepted: Jun. 7, 2014; Published: Jul. 30, 2014
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Authors
Mohammad Hossein Sepehri, Department of exercise physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and sports sciences, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz, Iran1
Masoud Nikbakht, Department of exercise physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and sports sciences, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz, Iran1
Abdolhamid Habibi, Department of exercise physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and sports sciences, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz, Iran1
Mustafa Moradi, Department of exercise physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and sports sciences, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz, Iran1
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Abstract
Introduction: The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of a single bout of resistance exercise with low intensity of oxidative stress on male students who did not do any regular sports whatsoever. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, 16 untrained subjects with a mean age of 24.40 ± 1.7 years, height 176 ± 6.83 cm, weight 69.89 ± 6.6 and BMI 22.89 ± 0.89 kg/ m2, were studied pre and post a low intensity resistance exercise. The exercise protocol involved Scott and leg stretching for the lower limbs and stretch underarm and chest press for the upper limbs. The subjects performed each exercise 3 times (one minute rest between sets). The low- intensity test was performed in 25-30% of one repetition maximum (25 to 30 reps). Malondialdehyde (MDA) as an index of lipid peroxidation was measured before exercise, immediately after and 6 and 24 h after exercise. Results: Our data were analyzed using one factor repeated measures. Our results revealed a significant increase in MDA in response to low intensity resistance exercise at pre and post exercise time points in untrained subjects (P<0.05). The peak increase was observed at immediately post-exercise time point (P<0.0001, F=98.36) and the measures returned to resting values 24 hours after the test. Conclusion: Overall, resistance exercise, even though low-intense one appears to increase resistance oxidative stress.
Keywords
Resistance Exercise, Oxidative Stress, Free Radicals, Malondialdehyde
To cite this article
Mohammad Hossein Sepehri, Masoud Nikbakht, Abdolhamid Habibi, Mustafa Moradi, Effects of a Single Low-Intensity Resistance Exercise Session on Lipid Peroxidation of Untrained Male Students, American Journal of Sports Science. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2014, pp. 87-91. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20140204.13
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