Anthropometric and Somatotype Characteristics of Emigrant Canadian Women Living in Canada
American Journal of Sports Science
Volume 4, Issue 1-1, February 2016, Pages: 22-26
Received: Dec. 9, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 10, 2015; Published: Jan. 20, 2016
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Author
Anup Adhikari, Anthropometrica, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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Abstract
One thousand four hundred and ten (1410) adult women age ranged from 19 to 40 year were measured randomly for their anthropometric and somatotype characteristics as a part of fitness counselling at local fitness clubs during the year 2010-2012 at Toronto. Women were from Greater Toronto Area (GTA) of Canada and living in Canada for the last 15 years or more after migrating from different countries and were from different ethnical groups. The age ranged from 19 to 40 years with an average value of 26.2 year (±5.5). Observed average height for the studied women was 162.7 cm (±6.9) with an average body mass of 68.9Kg (±16.6). Height ranged from 151.5 cm to 177.5 whereas body mass ranged from 48.2kg to 87.5 kg indicating wide range of height and body mass. Mesomorphic Endomorph body type (6.1±2.5 ─ 4.3±1.6 ─ 1.4±1.3) was obtained in average. Most of them (65.9%) were with Mesomorphic Endomorph body type whereas 10.6% women were Endomorph-Mesomorph, rest were in different other categories. 30.8% body fat in average was observed which was very high considering 18-20% fat range for athletic women.
Keywords
Canadian Women, Somatotype, Fat%, Emigrant
To cite this article
Anup Adhikari, Anthropometric and Somatotype Characteristics of Emigrant Canadian Women Living in Canada, American Journal of Sports Science. Special Issue: Kinanthropometry. Vol. 4, No. 1-1, 2016, pp. 22-26. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.s.2016040101.14
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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