Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Breast Cancer Screening among Female General Practitioners in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Cancer Research Journal
Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2014, Pages: 108-113
Received: Oct. 19, 2014; Accepted: Nov. 4, 2014; Published: Nov. 27, 2014
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Authors
Mohammed Yehia Saeedi, Deputy Ministry for Public Health, Assistant Deputy for Primary Health Care, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Fahad Al Amri, Deputy Ministry for Public Health, Assistant Deputy for Primary Health Care, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Ahmed Khair Ibrahim, Public Health & Community Medicine School, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Asyut, Egypt
Kassim Kassim, Deputy Ministry for Public Health, Assistant Deputy for Primary Health Care, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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Abstract
Background: Breast cancer has been ranked as the 1st cancer in women in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Screening, early detection and proper treatment of Breast Cancer was associated with more chances of better prognosis and long-term survival. The role general practitioner’s role is to provide professional knowledge, skills and support for patients as well as their caregiver about screening and prevention. This study aimed to investigate the level of knowledge of Breast Cancer risk factors, beliefs, diagnosis and practice of Breast Self Examination, Clinical Breast Examination and mammography among female General Practitioners who are currently working in primary health care center in Riyadh city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire among female physicians, currently working as General Practitioners in Primary Health Care centers were invited. Descriptive statistics: mean, standard deviation, frequencies, percentage were calculated. Results: The majority (90%) of the respondents believed that Breast Cancer is a major health problem and 96% were aware of the importance of mammography as a screening method. But only 19% of the studied physicians requested mammogram as screening tool for women aged 40 years or more. Conclusion: The current study demonstrated that knowledge about breast cancer screening was satisfactory and highlighted the need for the provision of continuing medical education programs to improve the general practitioners' practice on cancer screening tools.
Keywords
Breast Cancer, Mammography, Screening and General Practitioner
To cite this article
Mohammed Yehia Saeedi, Fahad Al Amri, Ahmed Khair Ibrahim, Kassim Kassim, Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Breast Cancer Screening among Female General Practitioners in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Cancer Research Journal. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 108-113. doi: 10.11648/j.crj.20140206.13
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