Comparative Effect of Natural Commodities and Commercial Medicines Against Oral Thrush Causing Fungal Organism of Candida Albicans
Science Journal of Clinical Medicine
Volume 2, Issue 3, May 2013, Pages: 75-80
Received: May 17, 2013; Published: Jun. 10, 2013
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Authors
Reena, T, Department of Microbiology, Malanakara Catholic College, Mariagiri, Kaliakkavilai
Rohitha Prem, Department of Microbiology, Malanakara Catholic College, Mariagiri, Kaliakkavilai
Deepthi, M. S, Department of Microbiology, Malanakara Catholic College, Mariagiri, Kaliakkavilai
R. Beni Ramachanran, Department of Microbiology, Malanakara Catholic College, Mariagiri, Kaliakkavilai
S. Sujatha, International Centre for Bioresources Management, Malanakara Catholic College, Mariagiri, Kaliakkavilai
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Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore the comparative analysis antifungal efficiency of six natural commodities and four commercial medicines against the oral thrush causing organism of Candida albicans. From the present result along with the six natural commodities, Mayaca showed maximum inhibitory activity against C. albicans followed by garlic, gooseberry, wine, coconut oil and pomegranate. While, the significant antifungal activity noted in Mayaca ehtanolic extract against C. albicans at 50 and 100µl concentration (P<0.05), and other natural substances such as garlic and gooseberry antifungal activity also expressed significantly. In the GC-MS analysis ten bioactive compounds were identified in the ehtanolic extract. Besides the identified bioactive peak phytochemical compounds named as 3,4-Dimethyl-2-3-methyl with its Ret. time 19.050 followed by second and third peak compounds are Diethylpthalate and Bis-3,4 methylene Dioxy accompanied with them responsible RT was 21.004 and 28.666 respectively. The overall results clearly denoted ethanol extract of Mayaca act as significant antifungal C. albicans agent mainly it was possessed specific antimicrobial secondary metabolic compounds present than other five natural commodities and four commercial products. Hence, the present study focused that the Mayaca extract act as a potential antifungal agent for oral thrush causing fungi of C. albicans.
Keywords
Candida Albicans, Natural Commodities, Mayaca, GC-MS
To cite this article
Reena, T, Rohitha Prem, Deepthi, M. S, R. Beni Ramachanran, S. Sujatha, Comparative Effect of Natural Commodities and Commercial Medicines Against Oral Thrush Causing Fungal Organism of Candida Albicans, Science Journal of Clinical Medicine. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2013, pp. 75-80. doi: 10.11648/j.sjcm.20130203.13
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