Dietary Diversity and Associated Factors Among Infants and Young Children in Wolaita Zone, Southern Ethiopia
Science Journal of Clinical Medicine
Volume 6, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 53-59
Received: Jun. 8, 2017; Accepted: Jun. 21, 2017; Published: Aug. 25, 2017
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Authors
Getu Gamo Sagaro, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences and Medicine, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia
Mihiretu Alemayehu, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences and Medicine, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Background: Increasing the variety of foods and food groups in the diet ensures that there is adequate intake of essential nutrients. Lack of dietary diversity especially for children 6-23 months is specifically critical because they require energy and nutrient-dense foods for both physical and mental growth and development. Encouraging children aged 6–23 months for appropriate complementary feeding practices reduces the incidence of stunting and leads to better health and growth outcome. A community based cross sectional study was conducted from May-June 2016, among children aged 6-23 months residing in rural districts of Wolaita Zone. Multi-stage sampling technique was applied to select 944 child-mother/caregiver paired study population. Data was collected through a pre-tested and structured interviewer administered questionnaire consisting of demographic characteristics variables, household wealth indicators, and dietary assessment tool and entered using Epi-data manager and client entry version 1.4.4.0 and exported to SPSS Version 20 for analysis. Variables having p < 0.25 at bivariate analysis were fitted to multivariate analysis. Odds ratio, P-value and 95% CI were computed to show the association of variables. The proportion of children who consumed minimum acceptable dietary diversity was 43.2% (95% CI: 40.0 – 46.6). The Diary and dairy products, meat, Vitamin A rich fruits and vegetables were less commonly consumed food groups. Older children (AOR = 2.49, 95% CI: 1.71, 3.64), maternal education of primary and secondary and above (AOR = 3.32, 95% CI: 2.01, 5.22) and (AOR = 4.78, 95% CI: 2.55, 8.95) were independent predictors of dietary diversity. Conclusion: Even though feeding practice of infants and young children is encouraging, plenty of children are still suffering from consuming inadequate dietary diversity. Hence, due attention has to be given to improve feeding practice of older children. Furthermore, improving parental education and economy result in proper child feeding practice.
Keywords
Dietary Diversity, Feeding Practice, Infants, Young Children, Wolaita
To cite this article
Getu Gamo Sagaro, Mihiretu Alemayehu, Dietary Diversity and Associated Factors Among Infants and Young Children in Wolaita Zone, Southern Ethiopia, Science Journal of Clinical Medicine. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2017, pp. 53-59. doi: 10.11648/j.sjcm.20170604.12
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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