Climatology and Historical Trends in Tropical Nights over the Georgian Territory
Earth Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 5-1, October 2017, Pages: 23-30
Received: May 17, 2017; Accepted: May 18, 2017; Published: Jul. 11, 2017
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Authors
Mariam Elizbarashvili, Geography Department, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Elizbar Elizbarashvili, Climatology and Agrometeorology Department, Institute of Hydrometeorology at Georgian Technical University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Nato Kutaladze, Hydrometeorological Forecast Models Adaptation and Implementation, Administration of Hydrometerological Department, LEPL National Environmental Agency, The Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Protection of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia
Shalva Elizbarashvili, Climatology and Agrometeorology Department, Institute of Hydrometeorology at Georgian Technical University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Roman Maisuradze, Geography Department, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Tea Eradze, Geography Department, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Neli Jamaspashvili, Geography Department, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Nano Gogia, Geography Department, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia
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Abstract
Based on the materials of observation of 50 meteorological stations of Georgia for the period between 1936-2013, research has been made of geography, structure, intensity, duration and dynamics of tropical nights on the Georgian territory. Nights are considered tropical if minimum air temperature is above 20°C (TR20). Tropical nights are most widespread in the intermountain trough – Kolkheti lowland, the plains of Central and Lower Kartli, Alazani valley, where the average number of tropical nights during one year reaches 35. With the growth of altitude, the number of tropical nights naturally decreases, and on the height of 1000m there are no tropical nights detected. As a result of global warming the increase in the number of tropical nights has been most notable on the Black Sea coast and in the region of the nearby Kolkheti lowland (4-6 days per decade). In the internal regions of the lowland and in the Eastern Georgia the rate of change decreases. On the Black Sea coast tropical nights start in April and last until October. They are most intense in July and August, exceeding 27°C. On the Kolkheti Lowland tropical nights start in March and last until November. Here they are more intense (27-30°C, June-July). In the Eastern Georgia the duration of tropical nights decreases. In Kartli they last from May until September, whereas in Kakheti they last from June until September. Maximum intensity of tropical is nights peaks in July or August, when it comprises 24-26.5°C. The intensity of tropical nights has increased by 0.1-0.3°C per decade.
Keywords
Tropical Night, Recurrence, Decadal Trend Rate, Coefficient of Determination, Intensity
To cite this article
Mariam Elizbarashvili, Elizbar Elizbarashvili, Nato Kutaladze, Shalva Elizbarashvili, Roman Maisuradze, Tea Eradze, Neli Jamaspashvili, Nano Gogia, Climatology and Historical Trends in Tropical Nights over the Georgian Territory, Earth Sciences. Special Issue: New Challenge for Geography: Landscape Dimensions of Sustainable Development. Vol. 6, No. 5-1, 2017, pp. 23-30. doi: 10.11648/j.earth.s.2017060501.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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