Seedling Mortality in Quercus Leucotrichophora A. Camus, Pinus Roxburghii D. Don and Shorea Robusta Gaertn Forest of Kumaun Himalaya, India.
International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis
Volume 1, Issue 3, June 2013, Pages: 91-94
Received: May 25, 2013; Published: Jun. 20, 2013
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Authors
Sanjay Kumar, Department of Botany, D.S.B. Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital-263002
Lalit M. Tewari, Department of Botany, D.S.B. Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital-263002
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Abstract
The studies on plant demography hold a considerable significance in plant ecology. Natural regeneration of different plant species through seeds depend primarily upon seed production, germination capacity of seeds and successful establishment of seedling. Successful regeneration of tree species might be considered to be a function of three major components; ability to initiate new seedlings, ability of seedlings and saplings to survive and ability of seedlings and saplings to grow. Several environmental stresses are known to affect the seedling growth but water stress isbelieved to be a major one. The canopy density and soil conditions also affect the growth of seedling.This study comprises three study sites located at29o 22’ N latitudes and 79o 29’ E longitudes along an elevation transect of 350 – 2500 m in Kumaun Himalaya. This region has certain characteristic climatic features. Though it falls under sub-tropical latitude, the abrupt rise in mountains creates a temperature comparable to that of a temperate climate. The seedling dynamics were studied at sal forest, banj oak forest and chir pine forest. For the computation of seedling mortalityand other characteristics, 2x2m permanent quadrats wereestablished in sal, chir-pine and banj oak forest. A total of 12 quadrats were placed in the stand (3 quadrats in each site). To record the mortality of the seedlings, all the seedlings of the year 2008 present in twelve quadrats in each forest were tagged. Their mortality was observed monthly from January 2009 – December 2009. Results show that mortality was very low (20%) at sal forest as compared to banj oak forest (25%) and chir pine forest (35%). The chir pine forest was heavily affected by human disturbance. So the seedling population was more affected if compared to two other sites. Since the biotic stress was negligible there was very little mortality during the study period in banj oak and sal forest suggesting that if biotic stress and natural disturbance is minimum, the rapid regeneration of Q. leucotrichophora and S. robusta would be possible.Current study provides information on the seedling dynamics in three forests types in the Kumaun Himalaya. Results show seedling mortality was very low (20%) at sal forest if compared to banj oak forest (25%) and chir pine forest (35%) so the rapid regeneration of Q. leucotrichophora and S. robusta would be possible.
Keywords
Seedling Mortality, Banj Oak Forest, Chir Pine Forest, Sal Forest, Kumaun Himalaya
To cite this article
Sanjay Kumar, Lalit M. Tewari, Seedling Mortality in Quercus Leucotrichophora A. Camus, Pinus Roxburghii D. Don and Shorea Robusta Gaertn Forest of Kumaun Himalaya, India., International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis. Vol. 1, No. 3, 2013, pp. 91-94. doi: 10.11648/j.ijema.20130103.13
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