Osmotic stress Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under HG and Elevated Temperature Environment
International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis
Volume 3, Issue 4, August 2015, Pages: 233-237
Received: Feb. 20, 2015; Accepted: Jul. 14, 2015; Published: Aug. 19, 2015
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Authors
Ambreen Gul, Food and Biotechnology Research Centre, Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories Complex, Lahore, Pakistan
Asma Siddique, Food and Biotechnology Research Centre, Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories Complex, Lahore, Pakistan
Quratulain Syed, Food and Biotechnology Research Centre, Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories Complex, Lahore, Pakistan
Muhammad Nadeem, Food and Biotechnology Research Centre, Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories Complex, Lahore, Pakistan
Shahjahan Baig, Food and Biotechnology Research Centre, Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories Complex, Lahore, Pakistan
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Abstract
The High Gravity (HG) ethanol fermentation at high temperature is very attractive and promising technology for fuel ethanol production. This study was designed to improve the osmotic as well as thermal behavior of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain isolated from distillery waste. Therefore, initial pH and substrate concentrations were optimized for this strain. The S. cerevisiae was subjected to thermal treatment to improve its fermentation ability without significant yield losses. At pHo 5.0, 95g/L ethanol was produced with the productivity (Qp) value of 1.02. The activation energy Ea value calculated at 30-40oC was 16.48kcal/mol indicating the thermal tolerance of the strain SC36. The results of glucose optimization revealed that at 250g/L glucose concentration, Qp, Yp/s and Yp/x value of 1.53g/Lh, 0.443g/g substrate and 41.4g/g biomass were obtained. The strain’s potential to be able to ferment very high gravity medium is very promising for fuel ethanol production
Keywords
Thermal Treatment, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Monod Model, High Gravity, Thermotolerant
To cite this article
Ambreen Gul, Asma Siddique, Quratulain Syed, Muhammad Nadeem, Shahjahan Baig, Osmotic stress Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under HG and Elevated Temperature Environment, International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 233-237. doi: 10.11648/j.ijema.20150304.15
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