Environmental Assessment of CO and SO2 Pollution Resulting from Bye-Product of Biomass Fuel at Gboko Town, in Benue State, Nigeria
International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis
Volume 4, Issue 5, October 2016, Pages: 127-130
Received: Aug. 10, 2016; Accepted: Sep. 2, 2016; Published: Oct. 8, 2016
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Authors
Aungwa Francis, Department of Physics, Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna, Nigeria
Danladi Eli, Department of Physics, Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna, Nigeria
Gyuk Philip Musa, Department of Physics, Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
Joshua Adeyemi Owolabi, Department of Physics, Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna, Nigeria
Gabriel Olawale Olowomofe, Department of Physics, Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna, Nigeria
Muhammad Sani Ahmad, Department of Physics, Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
Baba Isa Garba, Department of Physics, Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
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Abstract
The assessment of Carbon monoxide (CO) and Sulphur dioxide (SO2) was carried out at Gboko in Benue State, Nigeria. A total of six areas were surveyed across the town. The concentrations of the CO and SO2 varied from 1.90 to 8.00 ppm and 0.10 to 0.24 ppm respectively. Studies indicate that, the average hourly concentration in parts per million (ppm) of CO and SO2 in all the six points surveyed were found to be 4.98 and 0.15 ppm respectively, with a standard deviation of 1.83 ppm and 0.05 ppm. This is about 50.17 and 11.76 % deviations for CO and SO2 from the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 10.00 and 0.17 ppm for CO and SO2 respectively. These results do not pose an immediate threat to the environment but subsequent accumulation may be dangerous.
Keywords
Biomass, Bye-product, Concentration, Gasman Meter, Air Quality Standard, ppm, Pollution
To cite this article
Aungwa Francis, Danladi Eli, Gyuk Philip Musa, Joshua Adeyemi Owolabi, Gabriel Olawale Olowomofe, Muhammad Sani Ahmad, Baba Isa Garba, Environmental Assessment of CO and SO2 Pollution Resulting from Bye-Product of Biomass Fuel at Gboko Town, in Benue State, Nigeria, International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis. Vol. 4, No. 5, 2016, pp. 127-130. doi: 10.11648/j.ijema.20160405.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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