Analysis Strategy and Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction
International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis
Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2017, Pages: 48-55
Received: Oct. 24, 2016; Accepted: Mar. 15, 2017; Published: Mar. 28, 2017
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Authors
Adriani Bandjar, Chemistry Department, Mathematic and Natural Science Faculty, Pattimura University, Ambon, Indonesia
Rafael Marthinus Osok, Agriculture Faculty, Pattimura University, Ambon, Indonesia
I Wayan Sutapa, Chemistry Department, Mathematic and Natural Science Faculty, Pattimura University, Ambon, Indonesia
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Abstract
Strategies and Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction in Central Maluku of district Haruku Island-Indonesia have been conducted. This study was conducted consisting of a profile districts obtained Haruku island, the determination of V and C, as well as the picture of extreme rainfall. Based on the analysis of the obtained results as follows: In administrative districts of Haruku Island that consists of 11 villages were entirely concentrated on the island of Haruku. Haruku is part of the Maluku Islands is included in the category of patterns of local rainfall for the period of summer rains that took place as parts of Indonesia on generally experiencing drought. The rainy season occurs from May to August, the extreme rainfall occurred in 1989 and 2013 as many as four times. Based on calculations there is a village is in quadrant 5, three villages wards are in quadrant 2, three villages / wards are in quadrant 1, and four villages are in quadrant 3.
Keywords
Analysis, Disaster Risk Reduction, Haruku Island, Rainfall, Maluku
To cite this article
Adriani Bandjar, Rafael Marthinus Osok, I Wayan Sutapa, Analysis Strategy and Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction, International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 48-55. doi: 10.11648/j.ijema.20170502.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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