Determination of Beta Radiation Dose to the Thyroid Gland from the Ingestion of 131I by Patients
American Journal of Environmental Protection
Volume 5, Issue 6, December 2016, Pages: 168-178
Received: May 11, 2016; Accepted: Dec. 12, 2016; Published: Jan. 9, 2017
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Authors
M. A. Misdaq, Nuclear Physics and Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, University of Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech, Morocco
H. Harrass, Nuclear Physics and Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, University of Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech, Morocco
M. Karime, Nuclear Physics and Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, University of Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech, Morocco
A. Matrane, Nuclear Physics and Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, University of Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech, Morocco; Nuclear Medicine Service, Mohamed VI University Hospital Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech, Morocco
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Abstract
Total activities due to the ingestion of 131I were evaluated in different compartments of the human body of patients. It has been shown that the 131I activity in urine of patients increases when the 131I uptake decreases which could represent a source of radiation for their relatives when they leave hospitals. A new dosimetric model based on the specific beta-dose concept was developed for evaluating committed equivalent doses to thyroid due to 131I uptake by different age groups of patients. Data obtained are in good agreement with those obtained by using the ICRP model for iodine. Committed equivalent dose to the thyroid gland is influenced by the mass of thyroid, 131I uptake and energy of the emitted beta particles. In addition, 131I uptake was measured by using a gamma camera and committed equivalent doses to the thyroid gland of female patients from the ingestion of 131I for the treatment of hyperthyroidism diseases were evaluated. Data obtained by using our model and the ICRP ingestion dose coefficients are in good agreement with each other.
Keywords
131I Uptake, Thyroid Gland, Hyperthyroidism Disease, Beta Dose Assessment
To cite this article
M. A. Misdaq, H. Harrass, M. Karime, A. Matrane, Determination of Beta Radiation Dose to the Thyroid Gland from the Ingestion of 131I by Patients, American Journal of Environmental Protection. Vol. 5, No. 6, 2016, pp. 168-178. doi: 10.11648/j.ajep.20160506.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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