A New Approach and Tools for Perfecting Phytoremediation Technology
American Journal of Environmental Protection
Volume 4, Issue 3-1, May 2015, Pages: 143-147
Received: Feb. 26, 2015; Accepted: Mar. 1, 2015; Published: Jun. 25, 2015
Views 2214      Downloads 51
Authors
Tamar Varazi, Durmisidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology of Agricultural University of Georgia, David Agmashenebli Alley 240, Tbilisi, Georgia
Maritsa Kurashvili, Durmisidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology of Agricultural University of Georgia, David Agmashenebli Alley 240, Tbilisi, Georgia
Marina Pruidze, Durmisidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology of Agricultural University of Georgia, David Agmashenebli Alley 240, Tbilisi, Georgia
Gia Khatisashvili, Durmisidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology of Agricultural University of Georgia, David Agmashenebli Alley 240, Tbilisi, Georgia
Nino Gagelidze, Durmisidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology of Agricultural University of Georgia, David Agmashenebli Alley 240, Tbilisi, Georgia
George Adamia, Durmisidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology of Agricultural University of Georgia, David Agmashenebli Alley 240, Tbilisi, Georgia
George Zaalishvili, Durmisidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology of Agricultural University of Georgia, David Agmashenebli Alley 240, Tbilisi, Georgia
Marlen Gordeziani, Durmisidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology of Agricultural University of Georgia, David Agmashenebli Alley 240, Tbilisi, Georgia
Mark Sutton, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, USA
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
The development of methods for soil remediation for removal of chemical contaminants is a large and challenging problem. A new phytoremediation technology, given in the present work, is based on joint application of natural sorbents, microorganisms and plants. The method aims at prevention of chemical contamination of soils. It has the potential to restore a polluted environment and prevent dissemination of toxic compounds from hotbeds of pollution for a considerable length of time. The presented complex biotechnology is important from the viewpoint of prevention. This technology can be applied to soils contaminated with heavy metals, oil hydrocarbons, explosives, pesticides and other pollutants. The main purpose of the carried out work is the development of a novel approach to the provision of ecological safety. The approach is based on using natural minerals composites which are comprised of natural mineral rocks, microorganism strains with high detoxification abilities and plants-phytoremediators. In this composite material, the function of a sorbent is to uptake and to trap pollutants thus restraining their emission in the environment. The role of the microorganisms is to accomplish the first stage of biodegradation of organic contaminants and then to apply phytoremediation as a unique cleanup strategy. Natural sorbent can be applied during the initial stage of cleaning up of contaminated soil, followed by application of a phytoremediation technology through purposeful planting of selected plants. This results in the total assimilation and complete mineralization of pollutants and/or their intermediates or in their partial transformation by microbes.Following contaminants were used in the present work: explosive – 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT), oil hydrocarbon (hexadecane) and Wax (long chain hydrocarbons). Special attention was paid to enhancement of soil fertility, which improves microorganism and plant growth conditions and is important for bioremediation processes providing total rehabilitation of soil.
Keywords
Phytoremediation, Bioremediation, Contaminated Soils
To cite this article
Tamar Varazi, Maritsa Kurashvili, Marina Pruidze, Gia Khatisashvili, Nino Gagelidze, George Adamia, George Zaalishvili, Marlen Gordeziani, Mark Sutton, A New Approach and Tools for Perfecting Phytoremediation Technology, American Journal of Environmental Protection. Special Issue:Applied Ecology: Problems, Innovations. Vol. 4, No. 3-1, 2015, pp. 143-147. doi: 10.11648/j.ajep.s.2015040301.32
References
[1]
F. Korte, M. Behadir, W. Klein, J.P. Lay, H. Parlar, and I. Scheunert, “Lehrbuch der okologischen chemie,” Grundlagen and Konzepte fur die Okologische Beureilung von Chemikalien.Suttgart, Georg Thieme Verlag, 1992.
[2]
E.L. Arthur, and J.R. Coats, “Phytoremediation,” In: Pesticide Remediation in Soils and Water, P. Kearney and T. Roberts. Eds. New York, Wiley, 1998.
[3]
D.E. Salt, M. Blaylock, P.B.A. Nanda Kumar, V.P.Dushenkov, B.D. Ensley, I. Chet, and I. Raskin, “Phytoremediation: a novel strategy for the environment using plants,” Biotechnology, vol. 13, 1998, pp. 468-474.
[4]
D.T.Tsao, “Phytoremediation. Advances in Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology,” Berlin Heidelberg New York, Springer, 2003.
[5]
G. Kvesitadze, G. Khatisashvili, T. Sadunishvili, and J.J.Ramsden, “Biochemical Mechanisms of Detoxification in Higher Plants,” Basis of Phytoremediation, Berlin Heidelberg New York, Springer, 2006.
[6]
AS 482.2 Guide to the sampling and investigation of potentially contaminated soils, 1999.
[7]
Dee Schnoor, “Phytoremediation,” Technology Evaluation Report TE-98-01, Ground-Water Remediation Technologies Analysis Center, Ser E. Iowa City, 1997.
[8]
G.S.Fomin, and A.G.Fomin, “Soil. Control of quantity and ecological safety according to international standards,” Moscow, BNII Standard, 2001.
[9]
NWTPH-HCID “Hydrocarbon Identification Method for Soil and Water”, 2001.
[10]
US EPA Method3540C “Soxhlet Extraction;” Method 8572A. “Semivolatile organic compounds in soils and solid wastes using thermal extraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry”, 1996.
[11]
US EPA Method 418.1. “Total petroleum hydrocarbons,” 1997.
[12]
TNRCC Method 1006. “Сharacterization of C6-C35 petroleum hydrocarbons in environmental samples,” 2000.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
548 FASHION AVENUE
NEW YORK, NY 10018
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-688-8931