Fibre, Physical and Mechanical Properties of Ghanaian Hardwoods
Journal of Energy and Natural Resources
Volume 3, Issue 3, June 2014, Pages: 25-30
Received: May 15, 2014; Accepted: Jun. 3, 2014; Published: Jun. 20, 2014
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Author
Emmanuel Tete Okoh, Department of Furniture Design and Production, Accra Polytechnic, P O Box GP 561, Accra, Ghana
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Abstract
Wood fibre properties (fiber length, fiber width, cell wall thickness and lumen diameter), physical (oven-dry density) and mechanical properties (modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, compression parallel to the grain) of four tropical hardwood species (Terminalia superba (Ofram) and Terminalia ivorensis (Emere), as currently threatened timber species and Quassia undulata ( Hotrohotro) and Recinodendron heudelotii(Wama) as lesser used timber species were investigated to measure and compare their timber properties as potential substitutes. Tree normal trees of each tree species were selected and log samples were cut at the middle portion of stem height to determine the properties. The study revealed that, the densities, compression parallel to grain, modulus of rapture and modulus of elasticity of Ofram and Hortrohotro were not significant, but that of Emere and Wama were significant. The modulus of elasticity of Emere was however not significant. Based on these findings Hortrohotro could be substituted for Ofram and Emere with Wama.
Keywords
Fiber, Hardwood, Mechanical Properties, Lumen
To cite this article
Emmanuel Tete Okoh, Fibre, Physical and Mechanical Properties of Ghanaian Hardwoods, Journal of Energy and Natural Resources. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2014, pp. 25-30. doi: 10.11648/j.jenr.20140303.11
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