Environmental Impact Assessment Due to Gas Seepage of Titas Gas Field, Bangladesh
Journal of Energy and Natural Resources
Volume 9, Issue 1, March 2020, Pages: 35-38
Received: Nov. 13, 2019; Accepted: Nov. 29, 2019; Published: Feb. 25, 2020
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Authors
Sujon Kumar Gain, Department of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Rafsanjani Rafi, Department of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Shimul Hossain, Department of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Rashed Alom Emon, Department of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Hossain Al Tanjil, Department of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Tanveer Ahmed, Department of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Govinda Biswas, Department of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Md. Amin Al Anas, Department of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Shisher Jalal, Department of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
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Abstract
The biggest gas field of Bangladesh, Titas in Brahmanbaria continues to face a possible disaster due to the seepage of the huge amount of gas mixed with water and oil through thousands of holes and cracks on the surface environment in and around this gas field. Gas is leaking through more than 3,000 big holes, including some 30-ft diameter ones, spreading in paddy fields, water bodies, and the Titas river. Approximately 1000 acres of virgin land with varieties of flora and fauna have been affected through seepage. Soil condition in the villages has degraded and still degrading to such an extent that it becomes unpredictable to comment on how many years it needs to regain fertility. Yet the present alarming situation is rippled with confusion about the actual source of seepage till now. To help the situation, an assessment of the impact of gas seepage from the Titas gas field on the surrounding environment was needed to evaluate the overall environmental condition at present and to propose adequate control measures for the abatement of the adverse impact on the environment. Therefore, the main objective of this research work is to assess the environmental impact of this seepage from the Titas Gas field. To fulfill the object of this study, we have developed a questionnaire including 18 parameters. These parameters encompassed all the aspects of ecology, socio-economic and so on. We visited the study area and made the gathering with affected peoples. The answer to each parameter of the questionnaire has been taken from people. From this study, it is found that all the tube wells of the villages are automatically emitting a huge quantity of natural gas. It is observed that the emitting of gas from the tube well-produced enormous irritating noise. The air is found polluted in and around the site visited. The most severe and alarming finding the health-related disease (skin disease, asthma, hair fall, water-born diseases e.t.c). It is summarized that about six square km of the area of Bakail, Suhilpur, Shampur and Anandapur villages, the Titas River and Loiska swamp are at high risk due the seepage.
Keywords
Environmental Impact, Gas Seepage, Problem Assessment, Titas Gas
To cite this article
Sujon Kumar Gain, Rafsanjani Rafi, Shimul Hossain, Rashed Alom Emon, Hossain Al Tanjil, Tanveer Ahmed, Govinda Biswas, Md. Amin Al Anas, Shisher Jalal, Environmental Impact Assessment Due to Gas Seepage of Titas Gas Field, Bangladesh, Journal of Energy and Natural Resources. Vol. 9, No. 1, 2020, pp. 35-38. doi: 10.11648/j.jenr.20200901.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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