Temperature and Stirring Effect of Biogas Production from Two Different Systems
American Journal of Energy Engineering
Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2017, Pages: 6-10
Received: Apr. 3, 2017; Accepted: Apr. 20, 2017; Published: May 25, 2017
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Authors
Edmond Demollari, Department of Plant Sciences and Technologies, Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, Agriculture University of Tirana, Tirana, Albania
Etleva Jojic, Department of Plant Sciences and Technologies, Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, Agriculture University of Tirana, Tirana, Albania
Valdete Vorpsi, Department of Plant Sciences and Technologies, Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, Agriculture University of Tirana, Tirana, Albania
Erta Dodona, Department of Plant Sciences and Technologies, Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, Agriculture University of Tirana, Tirana, Albania
Enkeleida Sallaku, Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, Agricultural University of Tirana, Tirana, Albania
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Abstract
Biogas is a gas mixture, mainly consisting of methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the biological process of anaerobic digestion of various organic materials [1]. The percentage of methane in biogas will vary depending on the process conditions and the type of organic matter fermented [2-3]. The purpose of this article is to show the differences in CH4 production from two different anaerobic systems. The first system called Batch Environmental System (BES) function as total isolation system. The needed temperature depends on environment. The second system called Batch Constant Temperature System (BCTS) function as total isolation system but the applied temperature here is constant in whole experimentation time. Applied methods consists in checking the changes in temperature, differences in stirring speed and in determining the moisture contents together with mineral-organically material. Moisture content, mineral-organically material and pH are one of the main “sources” in order to predict theoretical biogas yield.
Keywords
Batch Constant Temperature System (BCTS), Batch Environmental System (BES), Methane Yield, Theoretical Points
To cite this article
Edmond Demollari, Etleva Jojic, Valdete Vorpsi, Erta Dodona, Enkeleida Sallaku, Temperature and Stirring Effect of Biogas Production from Two Different Systems, American Journal of Energy Engineering. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 6-10. doi: 10.11648/j.ajee.20170502.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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