Effect of Solar-Induced Water Temperature on the Growth Performance of African Sharp Tooth Catfish (Clarias Gariepinus)
International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy
Volume 4, Issue 1-1, January 2015, Pages: 39-43
Received: Oct. 30, 2014; Accepted: Nov. 2, 2014; Published: Jan. 11, 2015
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Authors
Wirawut Temprasit, Faculty of Fisheries Technology and Aquatic Resources, Maejo University, Sansai, Chiang Mai 50290, Thailand
Alounxay Pasithi, Faculty of Fisheries Technology and Aquatic Resources, Maejo University, Sansai, Chiang Mai 50290, Thailand
Suthida Wanno, Faculty of Fisheries Technology and Aquatic Resources, Maejo University, Sansai, Chiang Mai 50290, Thailand
Supannee Suwanpakdee, Faculty of Fisheries Technology and Aquatic Resources, Maejo University, Sansai, Chiang Mai 50290, Thailand
Sudaporn Tongsiiri, Faculty of Fisheries Technology and Aquatic Resources, Maejo University, Sansai, Chiang Mai 50290, Thailand
Natthawud Dussadee, School of Renewable Energy, Maejo University, Sansai, Chiang Mai 50290, Thailand
Niwooti Whangchai, Faculty of Fisheries Technology and Aquatic Resources, Maejo University, Sansai, Chiang Mai 50290, Thailand
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Abstract
The effect of solar-induced temperature on the growth performance of African sharp tooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus) was studied based on a completely randomized design (CRD). Fishes with an average initial weight of 4.07±0.58 g were cultured for 90 days in 3 treatments with 3 replications, outdoor plastic lining ponds (treatment 1), outdoor cement ponds (treatment 2) and indoor cement ponds (treatment 3). The study investigation revealed that water temperature was significantly different among treatments (p0.05) and the highest value was observed in treatment 3 (30.91±1.60 oC), followed by treatment 1 (29.19±1.54 oC) and treatment 2 (27.58±1.58 oC), respectively. Results of the experiment further showed that the differences in temperatures affected the growth and survival rate of the fishes. After 90 days of culture, fishes in treatment 1 had significantly higher weight (298.75±4.32 g/fish), growth rate (3.32±0.05 g/day) and survival rate (95.0±2.0) than treatment 2 (198.40±5.25 g/fish, 2.20±0.06 g/day and 89.0±2.0) and treatment 3 (198.40±5.25 g/fish, 2.20±0.06 g/day and 87.6±2.1) (p0.05). The results indicate that the application of plastic greenhouse to increase the temperature is an alternative that could be applied for aquaculture, especially during winter when temperature is unsuitably lower.
Keywords
Catfish, Plastic Greenhouse, Temperature, Solar Energy
To cite this article
Wirawut Temprasit, Alounxay Pasithi, Suthida Wanno, Supannee Suwanpakdee, Sudaporn Tongsiiri, Natthawud Dussadee, Niwooti Whangchai, Effect of Solar-Induced Water Temperature on the Growth Performance of African Sharp Tooth Catfish (Clarias Gariepinus), International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy. Special Issue: Renewable Energy Applications in the Agricultural Field and Natural Resource Technology. Vol. 4, No. 1-1, 2015, pp. 39-43. doi: 10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2015040101.16
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