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Coprophilia-Faeces Lust in the Forms of Coprophagia, Coprospheres, Scatolia and Plasterering in Dementia Patients, Our Thoughts and Experience
International Journal of Psychological and Brain Sciences
Volume 1, Issue 3, December 2016, Pages: 45-53
Received: Oct. 25, 2016; Accepted: Nov. 8, 2016; Published: Nov. 29, 2016
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Authors
Gregory Tsoucalas, Specialized Hellenic Centre for Alzheimer Disease and Related Syndromes, Neurological clinic "Agios Georgios", Alykes, Volos, Greece; History of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece
Markos Sgantzos, History of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece; Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece
Konstantinos Gatos, Specialized Hellenic Centre for Alzheimer Disease and Related Syndromes, Neurological clinic "Agios Georgios", Alykes, Volos, Greece
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Abstract
Coprophilia is a rather often behaviour among the dementia patients. Faeces lust, coprospheres, coprophagia, scatolia, and plasterering are the appearance patterns of this kind of peculiar phenomenon. It seems that dementia patients mentally return to a newborn status with simultaneously loss of toilet skills, acquiring primitive primordial basic instincts. Coprophilia in dementia is an unstudied behaviour. Eroticism, narcissism, fetishism, brain atrophy and/or frontotemporal malfunction, and gene mutations are implicated. Our objective is to study this peculiarity in dementia patients. Our scientific interdisciplinary team have selected a group of 37 patients presenting coprophilia during the last 5 years (January 2011 - January 2016), all clinic inmates. Positive practice overcorrection procedure should be instituted, and/or disciplinary enquiry, and/or SSRIs to reduce coprophilic incidents. In our clinic, a percentage between 8% to 12% of patients with mild to moderate dementia exhibited coprophilia, while among the patients with severe dementia the percentage was significantly lower, 1% to 2%. Our experience, when perusing the results of our study on dementia patients, drove us to conclude that specialized bondage during bed time is the only measure to reduce incidents. Among 37 coprophilic patients hospitalized inside the Hellenic Reference Centre for Alzheimer Disease and Related Dementia Syndromes the last five years, we haven't met not even one patients with complete remission besides our external interventions and efforts. There are no availliable batteries to actually measure behavioural patterns in coprophilia, while scientific data concerning aetiology and confrontation are rather limited due to lack of manuscript publication. We therefore, strongly believe that with the means availliable (procedures and medication), coprophilia in dementia is an incurable and unstoppable behaviour, and further study to understand and confront it should be administered in the near future.
Keywords
Coprophilia, Coprophagia, Coprospheres, Plasterering, Dementia, Specialized Bondage
To cite this article
Gregory Tsoucalas, Markos Sgantzos, Konstantinos Gatos, Coprophilia-Faeces Lust in the Forms of Coprophagia, Coprospheres, Scatolia and Plasterering in Dementia Patients, Our Thoughts and Experience, International Journal of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Vol. 1, No. 3, 2016, pp. 45-53. doi: 10.11648/j.ijpbs.20160103.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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