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Gatos Questionnaire for Early Detection of Suspicious Signs for Alzheimer Disease and Related Dementia Syndromes - GQEDSS - ADRDS Q160 v 1.0. Preliminary Results
International Journal of Psychological and Brain Sciences
Volume 1, Issue 3, December 2016, Pages: 69-85
Received: Nov. 9, 2016; Accepted: Dec. 9, 2016; Published: Dec. 20, 2016
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Authors
Gregory Tsoucalas, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Stamati Bourelia, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Anastasios Markellos, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Vasiliki Kalogirou, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Styliani Giatsiou, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Olga Repana, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Presveia Gatou, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Ifigeneia Georgousi, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Anna Maria Xanthi, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Andromachi Korenti, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Nikolaos Kosmas, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Antonios Antoniou, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
Konstantinos Gatos, Interdisciplinary Study Team, Neurological Clinic-Hellenic Reference for Alzheimer Disease and Dementia Related Syndromes Agios Georgios, Alykes Volou, Greece
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Abstract
Dementia presents a cluster of syndromes the effect human brain. It rises various social-economic and health care issues that are difficult to be confronted. Early detection of the possibility of an examinee to be inflicted by a dementia syndrome is an all neurologists quest. Our interdisciplinary team for some year know created a questionnaire that depicts a series of items that could have been changed before the diagnosis of a dementia to be set. Material and Method: More than 180 items were included in the questionnaire. The validation process excluded 26 items. Then n1=55 examinees enrolled to our study in order to be watched for 5 years (n2=26 were diagnosed with dementia). At the end of this period 26 were inflicted by a dementia (mostly Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia). All answered the GQEDSS - ADRDS Q160 v 1.0 (3 demographic items and 157 Likert scale items), and the MMSE questionnaires. A statistical analysis of the questionnaire was followed. The scree test formed 54 factors, followed by a key item analysis (15 key items) to simplify factors analysis' complexity. Conver¬gent or Criterion validity of the GQEDSS - ADRDS questionnaire was determined by establishing its correlation to the MMSE score using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Discriminant validity tested whether concepts or measurements that are supposed to be unrelated are, in fact, unrelated. Internal consistency validity of the GQEDSS - ADRDS was determined by calculating Cronbach alpha coefficient. Test-retest reliability (stability) was also performed. Results: The Bartlett Test of Sphericity was 2527.2 and it was significant (p<0.0015). The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy was equal to 0.801 showing that the data is suitable for factor analysis. The 160 items were analysed via maximum likelihood extraction method using a Varimax rotation. The correlation coefficients presented p<0.0005. The cut-off points (total summary of 700 scoring points) were set to a: a) < 120, there is a relatively small change, b) 121-180, there is a mediocre change, c) 181-220, there is a relatively good change, and d) >221, there is a relatively high change. Discussion: Although our study presents an intriguing questionnaire, our sample does not meet the Stevens' criteria. Small sample, examiners' subjectivity, non-randomized sample - Convenience, or consecutive sampling (all clients in the outpatient clinic), questionnaire longevity could present a series of BIASes. More study, co-operation with other specialized centres, and a better methodology are required.
Keywords
Dementia, Early Detection, Questionnaire
To cite this article
Gregory Tsoucalas, Stamati Bourelia, Anastasios Markellos, Vasiliki Kalogirou, Styliani Giatsiou, Olga Repana, Presveia Gatou, Ifigeneia Georgousi, Anna Maria Xanthi, Andromachi Korenti, Nikolaos Kosmas, Antonios Antoniou, Konstantinos Gatos, Gatos Questionnaire for Early Detection of Suspicious Signs for Alzheimer Disease and Related Dementia Syndromes - GQEDSS - ADRDS Q160 v 1.0. Preliminary Results, International Journal of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Vol. 1, No. 3, 2016, pp. 69-85. doi: 10.11648/j.ijpbs.20160103.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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