Macroeconomic Effects of HIV/AIDS: Protocol for a Systematic Review
International Journal of Economics, Finance and Management Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 6, December 2015, Pages: 672-677
Received: Dec. 16, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 25, 2015; Published: Jan. 4, 2016
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Authors
Danjuma Maijama’a, School of General Studies, Abubakar Tatari Ali Polytechnic, Wuntin Dada Bauchi, Nigeria; School of Economics, Finance and Banking, College of Business, Universiti Utara Malaysia, UUM Sintok, Kedah Malaysia
Shamzaeffa Samsudin, School of Economics, Finance and Banking, College of Business, Universiti Utara Malaysia, UUM Sintok, Kedah Malaysia
Shazida Jan Mohd Khan, School of Economics, Finance and Banking, College of Business, Universiti Utara Malaysia, UUM Sintok, Kedah Malaysia
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Abstract
Since its appearance over three decades ago, HIV/AIDS has become global pandemic and remain the most shocking disease humankind has ever faced. It causes more death than any other disease in sub–Saharan Africa (SSA) and worldwide, it is the fourth killer disease. The epidemic now is a major threat to macroeconomic growth and development, infecting people at their most productive age (15-49 years), and imposing hardship on households, communities, firms and eventually national economies. Considering the widely spread HIV/AIDS prevalence rate in SSA, a number of studies investigated the macroeconomic consequences of the epidemic, focusing mainly on per capita GDP or GDP growth rate as a measure of economic performance, with comparatively no or little research on GDP per person employ. In addition to dearth of research on the effect of health expenditure in reversing the epidemic, previous studies have failed to take the lag effect of the HIV/AIDS in to consideration in their estimation process. The association between HIV/AIDS and the macroeconomy is complex, with several studies reporting mix and conflicting results. This review aims to systematically synthesised research evidence on the effects of the epidemic on aggregate labour productivity, and assess whether health expenditure is effective in reversing the HIV/AIDS.
Keywords
HIV/AIDS, Macroeconomy, GDP Per Capita, Health Expenditure
To cite this article
Danjuma Maijama’a, Shamzaeffa Samsudin, Shazida Jan Mohd Khan, Macroeconomic Effects of HIV/AIDS: Protocol for a Systematic Review, International Journal of Economics, Finance and Management Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 672-677. doi: 10.11648/j.ijefm.20150306.13
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Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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