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Accounting Implications of Cost Involvement in Peace-keeping on the Economic Growth of Nigeria: The Case of Niger-Delta
International Journal of Economics, Finance and Management Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 5, October 2016, Pages: 275-283
Received: Mar. 21, 2016; Accepted: Apr. 18, 2016; Published: Oct. 11, 2016
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Authors
Akabom Ita Asuquo, Department of Accounting, Faculty of Management Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria
Egbe Esso Dickson, Department of Accounting, Faculty of Management Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria
Chinenyenwa Blessing Emechebe, Department of Accounting, Faculty of Management Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria
Ebri Okobe Uduma, Department of Accounting, Faculty of Management Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria
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Abstract
The study on accounting implications of cost involvement in peacekeeping on the economic growth of Nigeria; the case of militancy in the Niger-delta region was designed to ascertain the extent of cost involvement by government in peace-keeping and its implications on the economy. For this purpose, secondary data were obtained from the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) statistical bulletin and Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) statistical bulletin of 2014 for the relevant variables. The longitudinal research design was adopted in shaping the investigation. The regression model was employed to express the causal relationship between the dependent and the explanatory variables, and the Pearson Product Moment Correlation Analysis was used to determine the strength and direction of the relationship. The hypotheses were tested at five percent level of significance using the Student t-test. The result showed the following: the cost of peacekeeping significantly affects the growth of the economy; the cost of peacekeeping significantly affects the recurrent expenditure of government; Oil revenue does not significantly contribute to the economic growth of Nigeria; and losses from vandalized Oil pipelines does not significantly affect Oil output. However, it was recommended that more attention should be paid to the plight of the people of the Niger-delta region in order to completely discourage the use of militancy as a tool for seeking redress.
Keywords
Cost of Peace-Keeping, Recurrent Expenditure, Cost Involvement, Accounting Implications, Economic Growth, Niger-Delta, GDP
To cite this article
Akabom Ita Asuquo, Egbe Esso Dickson, Chinenyenwa Blessing Emechebe, Ebri Okobe Uduma, Accounting Implications of Cost Involvement in Peace-keeping on the Economic Growth of Nigeria: The Case of Niger-Delta, International Journal of Economics, Finance and Management Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 5, 2016, pp. 275-283. doi: 10.11648/j.ijefm.20160405.17
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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