Challenge of Ethiopian Federalism on the Right to Freedom of Movement and Residence on Ethnic Minorities
International Journal of Science, Technology and Society
Volume 8, Issue 2, March 2020, Pages: 18-27
Received: Apr. 25, 2020; Accepted: May 15, 2020; Published: May 27, 2020
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Authors
Ephrem Ahadu, Department of Civics and Ethical Studies, Wachemo University, Hosaena, Ethiopia
Alem Zergaw, Department of Civics and Ethical Studies, Wachemo University, Hosaena, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Ample research has been conducted so far about federalism and the type of federalism, yet the connection between ethnic federalism and the right to movement is not studied hence the main objective of this study is to assess the challenge of Ethiopian federalism on the right to freedom of movement and residence. Both primary and secondary data were employed in the study. The primary data collected through face to face discussion, by focusing on respondents that selected strategically and purposefully so as to conduct in-depth interview and FGD as well as proclamations and regulations. The study reveal that the challenges that minority individuals faces in exercising the right to freedom of movement and residence. Basically this research finds major problems that considered as hinder for minorities to live in sustainable way. Problems that minorities faces are regarded as benefits crisis, security problem and psychological trouble. The researchers would like to suggest that ethnic federal system should be averted to the geographical federal system and political parties should be discouraged from organizing themselves based on ethnic lines.
Keywords
Ethnic, Minorities, Federalism, Movement, Residence, Right, Freedom, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Ephrem Ahadu, Alem Zergaw, Challenge of Ethiopian Federalism on the Right to Freedom of Movement and Residence on Ethnic Minorities, International Journal of Science, Technology and Society. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2020, pp. 18-27. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsts.20200802.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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