Physical Activity Levels, Lesson Context, and Teacher Behaviours in Elementary Physical Education Classes Taught by Paraeducators
International Journal of Elementary Education
Volume 2, Issue 3, June 2013, Pages: 23-26
Received: Oct. 4, 2013; Published: Oct. 20, 2013
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Authors
James C. Hannon, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Fitni Destani, Keene State University, Keene, NH, USA
Brian McGladrey, Weber State University, Ogden, UT, USA
Skip M. Williams, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA
Grant Hill, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA, USA
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Abstract
In the USA some states permit the use of paraeducators to teach elementary physical education. These paraeducators are typically poorly trained and have little experience in the subject matter. There have been few studies examining the potential effects of professional development with paraeducators. The purpose of this study was to determine the physical activity levels, lessons context, and teacher behaviors of paraeducators who had received varied amounts of professional development training. A total of 18 paraprofessionals from a potential sample of 54 were randomly selected to be observed teaching physical education using the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT). ANOVA results indicated no significant differences by years of teacher training in each SOFIT category. Overall, children spent the majority of time in class standing (42.8%) and were only moderately-to-vigorously active for 32.1% of the class time, well below the national recommendation of 50% of class time. These results demonstrate that professional development is not enough to prepare paraeducators to teach elementary physical education. Only licensed and qualified teachers who complete professional training programs should be hired to teach in schools.
Keywords
Professional Development, Paraeducator, Physical Education
To cite this article
James C. Hannon, Fitni Destani, Brian McGladrey, Skip M. Williams, Grant Hill, Physical Activity Levels, Lesson Context, and Teacher Behaviours in Elementary Physical Education Classes Taught by Paraeducators, International Journal of Elementary Education. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2013, pp. 23-26. doi: 10.11648/j.ijeedu.20130203.11
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