Colleges of Education Graduates Academic Achievements in Visual Arts and Quality Delivering of Primary Schools Creative Arts Curriculum in Ghana
International Journal of Elementary Education
Volume 8, Issue 3, September 2019, Pages: 58-62
Received: Jul. 16, 2019; Accepted: Aug. 12, 2019; Published: Aug. 23, 2019
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Authors
Johnson Kofi Kassah, Department of Vocational Education, St. Francis College of Education, Hohoe, Ghana
Agbeyewornu Kofi Kemevor, Department of Graphic Design, University of Education-Winneba, Winneba, Ghana
Godwin Gbadagba, Department of Vocational Education, Dambai College of Education, Dambai, Ghana
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the colleges of education graduates academic achievements in visual arts and their subject matter competency for quality delivering of primary schools creative arts curriculum in Ghana. The study employed cross-sectional survey design. The study targeted visual arts lecturers and graduates of colleges of education. The sample size for the study was 241 (5 lecturers & 236 graduates). The instruments used for data collection were questionnaire and interview guide. The findings of H01 indicated that colleges of education graduates academic achievements in visual arts have no relationship with their subject matter competency for quality delivering of primary schools creative arts curriculum. The results of H02 revealed that teaching and learning resources have positive relationship with the quality delivering of primary schools creative arts curriculum. The study revealed that colleges of education graduates academic achievements in visual arts do not reflect their subject matter competency for quality delivering of the primary school creative arts curriculum. The study also found out that teaching and learning resources were not available for quality delivering of primary schools creative arts curriculum. The study recommended that Ghana Education Service should liaise with visual arts units in colleges of education to periodically organise workshops and seminars for primary school teachers to enhance their subject matter competency. The study also recommended that government should supply creative arts textbooks, modern visual arts teaching and learning resources and tools and materials lacking in primary schools to promote effective teaching and learning of creative arts.
Keywords
Visual Arts, Colleges of Education, Academic Achievements
To cite this article
Johnson Kofi Kassah, Agbeyewornu Kofi Kemevor, Godwin Gbadagba, Colleges of Education Graduates Academic Achievements in Visual Arts and Quality Delivering of Primary Schools Creative Arts Curriculum in Ghana, International Journal of Elementary Education. Vol. 8, No. 3, 2019, pp. 58-62. doi: 10.11648/j.ijeedu.20190803.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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