Analysis on Nature in Robert Frost’s Poetry
English Language, Literature & Culture
Volume 2, Issue 3, May 2017, Pages: 25-30
Received: Mar. 21, 2017; Accepted: Apr. 6, 2017; Published: May 17, 2017
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Authors
Yuanli Zhang, English Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, China
Wei Ding, English Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, China
Lixia Jia, English Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, China
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Abstract
Nature is the most distinguished feature in Robert Frost’s poems. Frost possesses deep love and sympathy towards nature. However, the typical pastoral life is not the central theme in Frost’s poems. Instead, Frost concentrates on the dramatic conflict happened in the natural world. His poems usually begin with an observation in nature and proceed to the connection to human psychological situation. According to Frost, nature is not only the source of pleasure, but also an inspiration for human wisdom. People will get the enlightenment from observation, thus nature becomes a central character in his poetry rather than merely a background.
Keywords
Robert Frost, Poetry, Nature
To cite this article
Yuanli Zhang, Wei Ding, Lixia Jia, Analysis on Nature in Robert Frost’s Poetry, English Language, Literature & Culture. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2017, pp. 25-30. doi: 10.11648/j.ellc.20170203.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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