Content-Based Instruction of EFL and Its Effects on Learners’ Needs in China
Education Journal
Volume 6, Issue 3, May 2017, Pages: 116-119
Received: Feb. 18, 2017; Accepted: Mar. 8, 2017; Published: May 2, 2017
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Author
Yi Peng, School of Foreign Studies, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, China
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Abstract
CBI is a content-centered EFL teaching approach. It has proven to be appropriate to the needs of specific learners. The CBI programs around the world are successful and meaningful. The learners’ needs for EFL in China can be described as a pyramid with four categories: test purpose, professional purpose, communicative purpose and mastering purpose. Applying CBI to college English courses in China can improve the status of language learners’ needs for testing towards for professional and communicative purposes.
Keywords
CBI, EFL, Learner’s Needs
To cite this article
Yi Peng, Content-Based Instruction of EFL and Its Effects on Learners’ Needs in China, Education Journal. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2017, pp. 116-119. doi: 10.11648/j.edu.20170603.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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