Analysis of M-learning Utilization Challenges, Learning Purposes and Benefits for Improved Business Education Outcomes in Nigerian Universities
Education Journal
Volume 4, Issue 6-1, December 2015, Pages: 1-8
Received: Sep. 3, 2015; Accepted: Oct. 8, 2015; Published: Nov. 30, 2015
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Author
Titus A. Umoru, Business Education, Kwara State University, Malete, Ilorin, Nigeria
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Abstract
The study centered on m-learning utilization challenges, learning purposes and benefits for improved business education outcomes in Nigerian Universities. The study identified 33 critical challenges, purposes and benefits of m-learning utilization that affect business education outcomes. The research question “what are the m-learning utilization challenges, learning purposes and benefits for improved business education outcomes in Nigerian Universities?” was answered. One hypothesis “significant difference does not exist between students and teachers’ responses regarding m-learning utilization challenges, learning purposes and benefits for improved business education outcomes in Nigerian Universities” was tested. Descriptive survey design was adopted for the study. M-learning Utilization Challenges, Purposes and Benefits Questionnaire (MUCPBQ) was used to gather data for the study. Cronbach Alpha was used to determine the reliability of the questionnaire which yielded a reliability coefficient of 0.74. The questionnaire items were administered on 281 teachers and 262 students who are registered members of the Association of Business Educators of Nigeria. All the respondents completed and returned their questionnaire. The data collected to answer the research question were analyzed using mean and standard deviation and the hypothesis was tested using one way Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) at 0.05 level of significance. It was found that m-learning devices have utilization challenges, learning purposes and benefits and there was no significant difference between teachers and students’ responses regarding m-learning utilization challenges, learning purposes and benefits for improved business education outcomes in Nigerian Universities (F (1, 541) = 1.67, P= 0.173). It was recommended, among others, that students, teachers and concerned university authorities should embrace the opportunities offered by m-learning devices by ensuring their effective utilization so that the challenges of utilizing m-learning devices would be overcome and the required business education outcomes achieved.
Keywords
M-learning, Utilization Challenges, Learning Purposes, Benefits, Business Education Outcomes
To cite this article
Titus A. Umoru, Analysis of M-learning Utilization Challenges, Learning Purposes and Benefits for Improved Business Education Outcomes in Nigerian Universities, Education Journal. Special Issue: New Dimensions in Vocational Business Education Teaching and Learning. Vol. 4, No. 6-1, 2015, pp. 1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.edu.s.2015040601.11
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