Dimensions of Social Media Addiction among University Students in Kuwait
Psychology and Behavioral Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 1, February 2015, Pages: 23-28
Received: Jan. 5, 2015; Accepted: Jan. 21, 2015; Published: Jan. 30, 2015
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Author
Jamal J. Al-Menayes, Kuwait University, College of Arts, Department of Mass Communication, Kuwait City, Kuwait
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Abstract
This study aimed to examine social media addiction in a sample of university students. Based on the Internet addiction scale developed by Young (1996) the researcher used cross-sectional survey methodology in which a questionnaire was distributed to 1327 undergraduate students with their consent. Factor analysis of the self-report data showed that social media addiction has three independent dimensions. These dimensions were positively related to the users experience with social media; time spent using social media and satisfaction with them. In addition, social media addiction was a negative predictor of academic performance as measured by a student's GPA. Future studies should consider the cultural values of users and examine the context of social media usage.
Keywords
Social Media, Addiction, Factor Analysis, Kuwait
To cite this article
Jamal J. Al-Menayes, Dimensions of Social Media Addiction among University Students in Kuwait, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2015, pp. 23-28. doi: 10.11648/j.pbs.20150401.14
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