Health Locus of Control, Death Anxiety and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Undergraduate Students in Nigeria
Psychology and Behavioral Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 2, April 2015, Pages: 51-57
Received: Jan. 28, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 9, 2015; Published: Feb. 16, 2015
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Authors
Adedeji Julius Ogunleye, Department of Psychology, Faculty of the Social Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
Gbenga Omojola, Department of Psychology, Faculty of the Social Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
Gboyega Emmanuel Abikoye, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria
Oyewole Samuel Oke, Department of Psychology, Faculty of the Social Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
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Abstract
This study examined the influence of health locus of control and death anxiety on risky sexual behavior among undergraduate students in Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Three hundred (300) undergraduate students were randomly selected from among the students of Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria for the study. Four hypotheses were tested and results revealed that there is a significant effect of health locus of control on risky sexual behavior [(F (1,296) = 7.74; P < .05]. It was found out that death anxiety does not influence risky sexual behavior [F (1,296) = 0.46; P > .05]. It was also revealed that there is a joint influence of health locus of control and death anxiety on risky sexual behavior [F (1,296) = 8.65; P < .05]. It was also found out that there is a significant difference in the levels of risky sexual behavior of female and male undergraduate students [t (298) = 6.44; P < .05]. The result indicated that age of respondents is a significant factor influencing their risky sexual behavior [t (298) = 5.58; P < .05]. It was also found out that there is a significant relationship between health locus of control and death anxiety [r = .451, P < .01], health locus of control and risky sexual behavior [r = .237, P < .01], and risky sexual behavior and death anxiety [r =.216, P < .01]. The result also indicated that a significant relationship exists between health locus of control and age [r = .136, P < .01]. The findings were discussed in line with previous literature and it was recommended that sex education be included in school curricular to enhance people’s communication about sexuality and sex related issues, and to boost healthy sexual and interpersonal relationships among dating partners and sexual populace which would, in turn, impact man-power and boost economy.
Keywords
Health Locus of Control, Death Anxiety, Risky Sexual Behavior, Undergraduate Students, Nigeria
To cite this article
Adedeji Julius Ogunleye, Gbenga Omojola, Gboyega Emmanuel Abikoye, Oyewole Samuel Oke, Health Locus of Control, Death Anxiety and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Undergraduate Students in Nigeria, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2015, pp. 51-57. doi: 10.11648/j.pbs.20150402.13
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