The Analysis and Countermeasures of the Psychological Problems of Impoverished Undergraduates
Psychology and Behavioral Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 4, August 2017, Pages: 65-69
Received: Aug. 7, 2017; Published: Aug. 11, 2017
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Authors
Shuo Zhang, Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology University, Dalian, China
Yingmin Li, Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology University, Dalian, China
Bin Liu, International School of Information Science & Engineering, Dalian University of Technology University, Dalian, China
Guishu Yu, Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology University, Dalian, China
Miao Tian, Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology University, Dalian, China
Le Qi, Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology University, Dalian, China
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Abstract
In this paper, for the ubiquitous impoverished undergraduate colony in the college, based on the abundant investigation and analysis, we dissected the psychological problems and characteristics of the impoverished undergraduates. Furthermore, we find out the key reasons of their psychological problems and explored the solutions. The research work of this paper can provide important basis in how to solve the "psychological poverty alleviation" problem of the impoverished undergraduates for the ideological and political workers. This research work has great practical significance.
Keywords
Impoverished Undergraduates, Psychological Problems, Countermeasures Research
To cite this article
Shuo Zhang, Yingmin Li, Bin Liu, Guishu Yu, Miao Tian, Le Qi, The Analysis and Countermeasures of the Psychological Problems of Impoverished Undergraduates, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2017, pp. 65-69. doi: 10.11648/j.pbs.20170604.14
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