Research on the Subjective Well-being of Junior High School Students
Psychology and Behavioral Sciences
Volume 8, Issue 6, December 2019, Pages: 166-172
Received: Dec. 2, 2019; Published: Dec. 3, 2019
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Author
Li Tianwei, Counselling Centre of Psychological Health and Education, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming, China
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Abstract
Objective: The purpose of this study is to analyze the current situation of subjective well-being of junior high school students and its influencing factors, and to provide some practical data for school workers to develop Happiness Education. Methods: Using the method of literature review and quantitative analysis, a questionnaire survey was conducted among 132 junior high school students in a middle school in a town by subjective well-being scale for adolescents. Results: (1) The subjective well-being of junior middle school students is in the middle level (4.3738±0.6567); (2) On the gender factor, boys and girls were significantly different in school satisfaction (4.4608±1.3273, 5.1094±1.0687, t=-2.903, P<0.05) and positive emotions (3.3464±1.0852, 4.1589±1.1383, t=-3.882, P<0.05); (3) In terms of grade factors, there are significant differences in environmental satisfaction only. Through pair wise comparison after the event, it is found that there was a significant difference in environmental satisfaction between Grade7 students (4.9375±1.0398) and Grade9 students (4.1500±0.5871) (p≤0.003). The difference between other grades was not significant. (4) Through the analysis of different background data, it is shown that different background factors have different effects on the subjective well-being of junior high school students. Conclusion: The subjective well-being of junior high school students is at the middle level. In terms of gender factor, boys and girls were satisfied with school (4.4608±1.3273, 5.1094±1.0687, t=-2.903, p<0.05) and positive emotion (3.3464±1.0852, 4.1589±1.1383, t=-3.882, p<0. 05) there was significant difference in the difference. Different background factors affect the degree of subjective well-being of junior high school students, family atmosphere, the object of the two factors are the most important dimensions of subjective well-being of junior high school students. The subjective well-being of junior middle school students is basically satisfactory, and different background factors have different effects on their subjective well-being. Educators need to distinguish and guide students.
Keywords
High School Students, Subjective Well-being, Differences
To cite this article
Li Tianwei, Research on the Subjective Well-being of Junior High School Students, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. Vol. 8, No. 6, 2019, pp. 166-172. doi: 10.11648/j.pbs.20190806.14
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