Role of Smart Phone Apps on Smart Phone Addiction Among Nigerian Undergraduates: Impact of Age, Gender, and Phone-Type
Social Sciences
Volume 9, Issue 5, October 2020, Pages: 155-159
Received: Jun. 23, 2020; Accepted: Jul. 17, 2020; Published: Sep. 14, 2020
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Authors
Esther Ukwuoma Orji, Department of Social Sciences, School of General and Basic Studies, Unwana, Nigeria; Akanu Ibiam Federal Polytechnic, Unwana, Nigeria
Levi-Lortyom Doofan Jennifer, Department of Social Sciences, School of General and Basic Studies, Unwana, Nigeria; Akanu Ibiam Federal Polytechnic, Unwana, Nigeria
Malla Naomi, Department of Social Sciences, School of General and Basic Studies, Unwana, Nigeria; Akanu Ibiam Federal Polytechnic, Unwana, Nigeria
Ewah-Otu Beatrice, Department of Social Sciences, School of General and Basic Studies, Unwana, Nigeria; Akanu Ibiam Federal Polytechnic, Unwana, Nigeria
Ugwu Gloria Ifeoma, Department of Information and Communication Technology, Directory Division, Unwana, Nigeria; Akanu Ibiam Federal Polytechnic, Unwana, Nigeria
Asogwa Kelechukwu Deborah, Department of Entrepreneurship Education, Directory Division, Unwana, Nigeria; Akanu Ibiam Federal Polytechnic, Unwana, Nigeria
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Abstract
The constant inclination on the use of smart phone applications (Apps) among students has gone above from normal purposes of using a smart phone to more active stage of conscious engagement in elaborate use. This has lead to one of behavioural problem prevailing among them today. This study sought to unveil the degree to which undergraduates are craving to smart phone apps and their demographic profile. Researching on the impact of Age, gender, and phone-type on Smart Phone Apps craving could probe into the prevailing variable that contributes greatly to Smart phone addiction. One hundred and two (102) undergraduates (51 males, and 51 females) aged 20 and 40 years ( M=2 5.35 years, SD= 2.58) participated in this study. The questionnaire used include group of questions related to demographic characteristics, and the Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS-SV) for measuring the studied variables. Purposive sampling techniques were used for data collection and Anova Statistics was used for data analysis. The result of the analysis showed that Age, and Phone-type had a significant main effect on Smart phone addiction, indicating that the age of these students and the type of phone they use aid to increase Smart phone addiction found among them. Gender did not account for Smart phone addiction. It was concluded that Age and Phone-type should be considered to be important factors in psychosocial interventions to minimize Smart phone addiction of undergraduates.
Keywords
Age, Gender, Phone Type, Smart Phone Addiction
To cite this article
Esther Ukwuoma Orji, Levi-Lortyom Doofan Jennifer, Malla Naomi, Ewah-Otu Beatrice, Ugwu Gloria Ifeoma, Asogwa Kelechukwu Deborah, Role of Smart Phone Apps on Smart Phone Addiction Among Nigerian Undergraduates: Impact of Age, Gender, and Phone-Type, Social Sciences. Vol. 9, No. 5, 2020, pp. 155-159. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20200905.13
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Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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