Effects of Marked Routes in You-are-Here Maps on Navigation Performance and Cognitive Mapping
American Journal of Applied Psychology
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2014, Pages: 131-137
Received: Sep. 9, 2014; Accepted: Nov. 13, 2014; Published: Nov. 17, 2014
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Authors
Sarah Lukas, Institute of Psychology and Education, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Victor Mittelstaedt, Institute of Psychology and Education, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Gabriel Olaru, Institute of Psychology and Education, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Cedric Sachser, Institute of Psychology and Education, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Julia Seibold, Institute of Psychology and Education, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Anke Huckauf, Institute of Psychology and Education, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
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Abstract
A You-are-here map (YAH map) is a popular way to guide way-searchers (i.e. a person who is navigating in a more or less unknown area to a specific goal) through a designated area. With current technologies, information such as the current position and the optimal route to a chosen destination can be provided easily by marking the route in a map. In our study, we investigated the advantages and disadvantages of such marked routes on navigation performance in desktop virtual environments. 24 participants navigated through a 2 ½ D virtual environment. Navigation performance was measured by navigation time and number of deficiencies. In order to separate effects of cognitive maps from those of navigation performance, participants were asked to draw sketch maps after each trial. The results showed that participants who were shown the optimal route marked in the map beforehand, exhibited impaired knowledge of the environment and impaired navigation performance compared with those viewing the map without the route, independent of route complexity or viewing time of the map. Although map goodness was only slightly better when the route was not marked, the representation of the periphery was rated significantly better. Only route accuracy was better in the condition in which the route was marked. The results are interpreted in such way that basic impairments arise in cognitive mapping when reading a map of the designated area with a marked route, resulting in worse navigation performance.
Keywords
Way-finding, Navigation, You-Are-Here Maps, Cognitive Map, Marked Routes
To cite this article
Sarah Lukas, Victor Mittelstaedt, Gabriel Olaru, Cedric Sachser, Julia Seibold, Anke Huckauf, Effects of Marked Routes in You-are-Here Maps on Navigation Performance and Cognitive Mapping, American Journal of Applied Psychology. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2014, pp. 131-137. doi: 10.11648/j.ajap.20140306.13
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