Recovery Orientation Among Individuals with Serious Mental Illness
American Journal of Applied Psychology
Volume 6, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 71-74
Received: Apr. 17, 2017; Accepted: Apr. 27, 2017; Published: Oct. 18, 2017
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Authors
Aaron Fernandez, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia
Kit-Aun Tan, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia
Ruziana Masiran, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia
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Abstract
In the present study, we examined differences between individuals with schizophrenia and individuals with neuroses in a suburban clinical sample with respect to recovery orientation. A sample of 100 psychiatric patients from one public hospital in Selangor, Malaysia participated in this study. Participants’ recovery orientation was assessed by the Recovery Assessment Scale Questionnaire. The Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was significant. Univariate tests further showed that there was a significant difference across two different diagnoses on reliance on others. In particular, individuals with neuroses had higher reliance on others than individuals with schizophrenia did. In an attempt to promote recovery orientation among individuals with serious mental illness, social connection and social support are domains that mental health care providers could target on.
Keywords
Recovery Orientation, Serious Mental Illness, Social Connection, Reliance on Others
To cite this article
Aaron Fernandez, Kit-Aun Tan, Ruziana Masiran, Recovery Orientation Among Individuals with Serious Mental Illness, American Journal of Applied Psychology. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2017, pp. 71-74. doi: 10.11648/j.ajap.20170604.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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