Religion and Income as Determinant of Well-being Among Employees in Faith-Based and Secular Educational Institutions in Southern Nigeria
American Journal of Applied Psychology
Volume 8, Issue 2, March 2019, Pages: 43-49
Received: May 7, 2019; Accepted: Jun. 12, 2019; Published: Jun. 26, 2019
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Authors
Ngozi Caroline Uwannah, Department of Education, Babcock University, Ilishan, Nigeria
Promise Nkwachi Starris-Onyema, Department of Sociology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Helen Ihuoma Agharanya, Department of Sociology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Onyinyechi Gift Mark, Pre-Degree Unit, Babcock University, Ilishan, Nigeria
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Abstract
This study investigated the influence of religion and income on well-being among employees in faith-based and secular educational institutions in Southern Nigeria. Three hypotheses were formulated and a total of 500 employees from the study area served as participants. The instruments used for data collection included the Demographic Data Inventory (DDI), Well-Being Scale (WBS), and Religion Scale (RS). Data collected were analyzed by means of multiple regression analysis and independent samples t-test. Results revealed significant combined contributions of religion and income to the well-being of employees in faith-based and secular educational institutions in Southern Nigeria (F (2, 497) = 56.467, p < .05), accounting for 25.3% of the variance in their well-being and relative contributions of religion and income to their well-being with income (β = .346; t = 20.491; p < .05) being a stronger predictor of employee well-being than religion (β = .318; t = 18.773; p < .05). There was also a significant difference between employees in faith-based and secular educational institutions in the contribution of religion and income to well-being (t = 9.372, p < .05). It was recommended, among other things, that religious involvement among employees should be encouraged and a steady flow of income in the forms of salaries, allowances, and bonuses should be maintained.
Keywords
Religion, Income, Well-Being, Employees, Faith-Based Educational Institutions, Secular Educational Institutions
To cite this article
Ngozi Caroline Uwannah, Promise Nkwachi Starris-Onyema, Helen Ihuoma Agharanya, Onyinyechi Gift Mark, Religion and Income as Determinant of Well-being Among Employees in Faith-Based and Secular Educational Institutions in Southern Nigeria, American Journal of Applied Psychology. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2019, pp. 43-49. doi: 10.11648/j.ajap.20190802.13
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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