Students’ Perceptions of Using Collaborative Learning as a Tool for Acquiring Writing Skills in University
American Journal of Applied Psychology
Volume 4, Issue 3-1, June 2015, Pages: 1-6
Received: Jan. 12, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 2, 2015; Published: Mar. 6, 2015
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Authors
Daljeet Singh Sedhu, Research Centre for Educational Psychology and Instructional Strategies, Kampar, Malaysia ; Tunku Abdul Rahman University College, Perak Branch Campus, Kampar, Malaysia
S. Chee Choy, Research Centre for Educational Psychology and Instructional Strategies, Kampar, Malaysia ; Tunku Abdul Rahman University College, Perak Branch Campus, Kampar, Malaysia
Mun Yee Lee, Research Centre for Educational Psychology and Instructional Strategies, Kampar, Malaysia ; Tunku Abdul Rahman University College, Perak Branch Campus, Kampar, Malaysia
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Abstract
This paper examines students’ perceptions of the use of group discussion as a collaborative learning tool among English-as-a-Second-language (ESL) learners when learning writing skills in university. Studies on collaborative learning have shown that group discussions enhance students’ learning experiences and knowledge. Collaborative learning in the form of group discussions has encourages students to produce work that is creative as well as stimulate critical thinking. This form of learning further develops interpersonal skills and social relationships among students. Twenty-four university students divided into six groups were the respondents in this study. The data was collected using voice recorded transcriptions of a semi-structured interview session with each group after completing the collaborative learning activity. The transcriptions were then analysed qualitatively using the interpretative approach. The transcripts were read and reread until common ideas emerged that were then categorised and discussed under various themes. The results showed that students perceived that collaborative learning tended to help them reflect on the content and context of the tasks they had to carry out. This form of learning was perceived to increase their confidence and motivation to communicate with their peers in a second language, and there were higher rates of task completion.
Keywords
Students’ Perceptions, Group Discussion, Collaborative Learning
To cite this article
Daljeet Singh Sedhu, S. Chee Choy, Mun Yee Lee, Students’ Perceptions of Using Collaborative Learning as a Tool for Acquiring Writing Skills in University, American Journal of Applied Psychology. Special Issue: Psychology of University Students. Vol. 4, No. 3-1, 2015, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.ajap.s.2015040301.11
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